University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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Showing 1–6 of 6 collections
  • Aerial Photographic Index Maps
    Map Library  ·   Digital Special Collections
    Description
    The Map Library maintains a comprehensive collection of over 190,000 aerial photographs for all Illinois counties, with the earliest photographs from the late 1930s and the most recent from 2005. Most of the photographs are black-and-white and are either 6 x 9 or 9 x 9 inches. Photographs taken before 1988 are county-based sets and are at an approximate scale of 1:20,000. Each year has its own index. Beginning in 1988, photography of the state was created as a state-wide set, at a scale of approximately 1:40,000. These photographs are quarter-quadrangle centered. Most of the photographs are products of the United States Department of Agriculture or the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with state agencies. Beginning in fall 2018, the University Library is scanning the indexes to all of the aerial photography sets in alphabetical order by county name. Library users, especially those at a distance from Champaign-Urbana, are encouraged to use the scanned indexes to identify needed photographs and to request photographs through the web-based request form [https://forms.illinois.edu/sec/1947069]. The link to the form appears on each index sheet’s webpage. Once photographs have been retrieved from our files, the Map Library will contact requesters regarding in-library use or scanning. For additional information about the Map Library’s collection of aerial photographs, including a table of the Library’s holdings for each county, please see Aerial Photography in the Map Library [https://www.library.illinois.edu/max/collections/aerial_photographs/].
  • Aerial Stereograms
    Map Library  ·   Digital Special Collections
    Description
    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Committee on Aerial Photography began to prepare a set of aerial stereogram photographs to support instruction in aerial photography interpretation in 1959. The stereograms were created primarily from United States government photography. Source image dates range between 1936 and 1970. A stereogram is usually a “3D” picture hidden within a picture; they often appear in Sunday newspaper comic strip supplements. Aerial stereograms are created from pairs of aerial photographs that show the same location but from slightly different angles. By viewing the photo pairs through a stereoscope, the brain can be tricked into seeing or perceiving an impression of heights and depths. The aerial stereograms in the Committee on Aerial Photography collection show a wide variety of features, both natural and man-made, throughout the United States. Brief descriptions of each stereogram are available in a separately-published catalog, “University of Illinois Catalog of Stereogram Aerial Photographs.” The catalog is included in the scanned collection. Instructors are encouraged to download and print the images for classroom or laboratory instructional use. Please contact the Map Library with questions regarding reproduction for publication via e-mail (http://www.library.illinois.edu/mailform/mail.php?emailcode=mapandgeog) or by calling 217-333-0827.
  • River Maps
    Map Library  ·   Digital Special Collections
    Description
    The importance of rivers to the state of Illinois cannot be underestimated. The entire state is in the Mississippi River’s drainage basin. Rivers have historically been core to the transportation of people and goods in and out of the state. Changes in river location have changed the shape of the state. For example, a nineteenth century Mississippi River course change cut off Kaskaskia, the first state capital, from the rest of the state. The state song for Illinois acknowledges the importance of rivers in its first line: By thy rivers gently flowing, Illinois, Illinois. The rivers that bound and flow through Illinois are ever-changing, through both natural and man-made processes. The maps in this collection document some of those changes. Many of the maps, in particular those from the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries, are large-scale showing the river in great detail. Besides the maps included in this collection of materials, aerial photographs that include rivers in Illinois as well as of parts of the Mississippi, Ohio, and Wabash rivers on the state’s borders can be found in sets of photographs for Illinois counties in the Map Library. Indexes for these sets are available online through the Digital Collection Aerial Photographic Index Maps (https://digital.library.illinois.edu/collections/7ee60e00-a7f0-0136-5261-0050569601ca-e). Older, smaller-scale maps that include rivers of Illinois and the upper Midwest may be viewed in the Historical Maps Online collection (https://digital.library.illinois.edu/collections/810d3fa0-e3fb-012f-c5b6-0019b9e633c5-a ). Please contact the Map Library regarding these items via e-mail (http://www.library.illinois.edu/mailform/mail.php?emailcode=mapandgeog) or by calling 217-333-0827.
  • Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps
    Map Library  ·   Digital Special Collections
    Description
    The University Library’s collection of Sanborn fire insurance maps includes maps for Illinois towns; rural settings are not included. Sanborn maps were produced to assist insurance underwriters in determining fire insurance rates for individual buildings by examining the buildings' construction methods, heat and lighting sources and manufacturing uses, and the same attributes of nearby buildings. The maps primarily provide information on the downtown areas of cities and adjoining residential areas. They are a record of urban development from the 1880s through the first half of the twentieth century. Family historians may find them interesting in documenting family homes and businesses. The maps in the collection are duplicates of the maps held at the Library of Congress. Maps in this image collection pre-date 1923. For information about later coverage, please go to the Map Library’s Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps (https://www.library.illinois.edu/max/collections/sanborns_about/) web page. Contact the Map Library with questions regarding coverage and access via e-mail (http://www.library.illinois.edu/mailform/mail.php?emailcode=mapandgeog) or by calling 217-333-0827.
  • United States Department of Agriculture Soil Maps
    Map Library  ·   Digital Special Collections
    Description
    Recognizing that the characteristics of soil have a great impact on the quality and yield of crops, the United States Department of Agriculture Division of Soils, later Bureau of Soils, created soil survey reports and maps to document areas of and differences in soil types and to describe problems encountered by specific agricultural processes or crops. Field Operations of the Bureau of Soils was produced annually by the U.S. Department of Agriculture form 1899 (1st) through 1922 (24th), with the first two reports (1899-1900) published as the Field Operations of the Division of Soils. Reports included an extensive text and a set of soil survey maps for various counties, parishes, and locations in the United States. This collection consists of digitized soil survey maps. Digitized texts can be found in the HathiTrust (https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/002137918). Additionally, links to text for individual years are included as part of the descriptions of the scanned maps.
  • World War I Maps
    Map Library  ·   Digital Special Collections
    Description
    The World War I maps collection contains maps and atlases published shortly before, during, and after World War I. The maps included cover all areas of the world showing the course of the war and its economic, political, and social contexts. Types of maps encompass propaganda maps, trench maps and other maps of battles and fronts, ethnographic and economic maps, maps and atlases for citizens at home, and maps created to support work of the United States delegation to the Paris Peace Conference. Please contact the Map Library with questions regarding these items via e-mail (http://www.library.illinois.edu/mailform/mail.php?emailcode=mapandgeog) or by calling 217-333-0827.