University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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  • Testing the Behavior Implications of Profit Maximization in Manufacturingfirms
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Boie, John Michael
    Description
    Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1969.
  • Functional Groups of Soil Humic Acids
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Butler, John Herbert Anthony
    Description
    153 p.
  • Major Developmental Events in Maize--Their Timing, Correlation and Matureplant Expression
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Siemer, Eugene Glen
    Description
    Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1964.
  • Ecological Variation of Partridge Pea (Cassia Fasciculata, Michx.) in Illinois
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Foote, Lawrence Eugene
    Description
    Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1965.
  • The Existential Graphs of Charles S. Peirce
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Roberts, Don Davis
    Description
    319 p.
  • Nietzsche's View of Science and Art
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Tursman, Richard Allen
    Description
    Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1964.
  • Judgment and Feeling in the Aesthetic Theory of Bernard Bosanquet
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Osborn, Velva Jeanne
    Description
    Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1965.
  • Induction and Repression of Nitrate Reductase in Corn (Zea Mays L.) Seedlings
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Schrader, Lawrence Edwin
    Description
    104 p.
  • Variations in Plant Development Under Various Conditions of Interspecific and Intraspecific Competition in Grass-Legume...
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Andrews, Olin Noveller, Jr.
    Description
    Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1967.
  • Development of Equations Describing Transport of Mass and Momentum in Porous Media, With Special Reference to Soils
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Raats, Petrus Antonius Cornelius
    Description
    Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1965.
  • Gauthier, Stevenson, and Practical Reasoning
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Cordero, Ronald Anthony
    Description
    177 p.
  • Heuristic Algorithms for Stability Testing Polytopes of Matrices
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Otto, Karen Lorraine
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • New Codes Beyond the Zyablov Bound and the Goppa-Based Justesen Codes
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Kleinhenz, Robert Joseph
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory changed its name from Control Systems Laboratory
  • Design of Totally Self-Checking Asynchronous Sequential Machines
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Özgüner, Füsun
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • Failure Analysis and Modeling of a Multicomputer System
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Subramani, Sujatha Srinivasan
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • Milton Nascimento and the Clube da Esquina: popular music, politics, and fraternity during Brazil’s military...
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Holmes, Holly L
    Description
    While military leaders and politicians plotted to overthrow the João “Jango” Goulart administration, a youth collective of popular music composers coalesced on the esquinas [street corners] of Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Led by Milton Nascimento, the music of the Clube da Esquina came to epitomize música mineira [music from Minas Gerais state] in the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s. The Clube da Esquina sound is distinctive as much for its lyrics about fraternity and loyalty as it is for its collective approach to music-making and audio production. Nascimento and his collaborators also used music as a form of protest against the dictatorship (1964-85), particularly when a majority of Nascimento’s fifth album Milagre dos Peixes (Odeon, 1973) was censored by the regime. When Nascimento resolved to release the album without lyrics, censors condemned the “aggressive” sound of the voice, and Nascimento described the impact of his voice “como uma arma [like a gun].” Using ethnographic data and archival research, this dissertation documents the social and musical history of Milton Nascimento and his collaborators, who came to be known as the Clube da Esquina, in Minas Gerais in the 1950s through the 1970s. Early chapters argue for Milton Nascimento’s comprehension as an orchestrator of personalities, due to his collective approach to music-making and judicious selection of particular collaborators. Though often described as a regional sound by Brazilian music journalists, Nascimento’s music subverts mineiro stereotypes as often as it confirms them. In particular, Nascimento’s music brought regional pride to Minas Gerais, while recognizing subaltern voices, especially afro-mineiros and the agricultural worker. Latter chapters explore the Clube da Esquina’s contribution to Brazilian canção de protesto [protest song] during the anos de chumbo [leaden years] of the dictatorship (1968-74). The Clube da Esquina used textual themes as well as extra-lyrical strategies to communicate political dissent in combination with regional, national, pan-Latino, and international musical styles. Sonic field analysis is introduced as a method by which to analyze how texture and scale on audio recordings can inform musical meaning. Heard in the historical moment of radical clandestine movements, disappearances and torture, and divisive debates about musical authenticity, the collective constructed a diverse set of symbolic expressions relevant to the socio-political concerns of Brazilian audiences, especially youth.
  • Immaterialist solutions to puzzles in personal ontology
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Whaley, Kristin Seemuth
    Description
    What are we? Despite much discussion in historical and contemporary philosophy, we have not yet settled on an answer. A satisfactory personal ontology, an account of our metaphysical nature, will be informed by issues in the metaphysics of material objects. In the dissertation, I target two prominent materialist ontologies: animalism, the view that we are numerically identical to human organisms, and constitutionalism, the view that we are constituted by, but not identical to, human organisms. Because of the problems that arise from endorsing these ontologies, I instead advance immaterialism, the view that we are essentially immaterial. In Chapter 2, I discuss how animalists must respond to a widely-discussed metaphysical puzzle, the problem of the many. This puzzle prompts some to endorse revisionary ontologies of material objects, and I argue that the animalist cannot appeal to these revisionary ontologies to solve the puzzle as it arises for personal ontology. In addition, solutions that don’t involve a commitment to revisionary ontology will be unavailable to the animalist: I argue that if animalists make use of non-revisionary solutions to the problem, they must abandon the most successful argument for their view. Absent their most successful argument, animalists will need to motivate the view in some other way. Some new arguments for animalism have been proposed, and I argue that they fail to give us reason to endorse animalism over competing ontologies. Without a strong argument, we should not prefer animalism over the other, more attractive, views. In Chapter 3, I show how constitutionalists face a different problem: explaining how the person is not the very same thing as the human organism, despite sharing the very same parts and occupying the very same physical space. We think that the person and the organism are different things because they have different modal profiles – the human organism can survive permanent loss of psychological life, but the person, presumably, cannot. Constitutionalists must then explain what grounds the difference in modal profiles, but such an explanation is hard to come by. This is an instance of the grounding problem, which is notoriously intractable. While the grounding problem is a well-known challenge to constitutional accounts of objects, I demonstrate that this puzzle is even more threatening when applied to persons. Some “solutions” to the problem fail to solve it at all, and solutions that might get the right result for ordinary objects require accepting that there are a multitude of persons where we ordinarily take there to be only one. We should not accept a personal ontology that requires a commitment to that multitude. I argue that the threat of the grounding problem is so great that we must reject the constitutionalist personal ontology. We will see from these puzzles in personal ontology that materialist solutions are either unsuccessful or yield unacceptable consequences. This should prompt us toward considering, instead, immaterialism. According to immaterialism, persons are not material objects, and the immaterialist can then provide solutions to the puzzles that threatened materialist ontologies. In Chapter 4, I outline these immaterialist solutions and show that the puzzles cannot be reinstantiated successfully against the immaterialist. I then discuss different available varieties of immaterialism and argue in defense of my preferred version. Ultimately, I argue that we are simple, immaterial entities that come into existence at the proper functioning of the brain. Endorsing this view of personal ontology permits us to adequately respond to metaphysical puzzles and retain judgments about persons that should be most important to us. In particular, the immaterialist has the resources to avoid the problem of too many thinkers and retain the judgment that there is exactly one person in circumstances where we take there to be just one. The immaterialist also has the resources to plausibly analyze thought experiments, such as cerebrum-swap cases, that threaten materialist ontologies. All things considered, it remains to be seen which personal ontology has the most evidence in its favor. In the context of debates that arise from material object metaphysics, however, evidence weighs in favor of immaterialism. Materialist personal ontologies are saddled with unacceptable responses to metaphysical puzzles, and endorsing materialism about persons requires taking on a very high cost: Either there are far more of us than we ordinarily take there to be, or there are no persons – far fewer of us than we ordinarily take there to be. Some might argue that these are the only acceptable options, so cost be damned. But we cannot afford to be so cavalier about our personal ontology. Instead, I advance immaterialist solutions to puzzles in personal ontology and propose that, in the interest of saving ourselves and everyone we love, we should seriously consider accounts according to which we are immaterial entities.
  • Contrast preservation and constraints on individual phonetic variation
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Eager, Christopher David
    Description
    Ferdinand de Saussure, one of the founders of modern Linguistics, described language as a system where everything holds together. Regarding the sounds of language, this has led to the current view that the phonology of a language consists of a complex system of relations between contrastive phonemes. In this dissertation, I test whether there are constraints on individual phonetic variation from a multivariate perspective due to this system of relations, and how these constraints interact with contrast preservation. Two main views of contrast preservation are considered. The first view is that contrast preservation is merely an outcome of other regular phonetic processes that affect multiple consonants simultaneously. The second view is that contrast preservation acts as a constraint on the phonetic realization of phonemes. To this end, two phonetic experiments are performed. In both experiments, multiple acoustic measures of intervocalic consonant strength are taken, and PCA is used for dimensionality reduction, resulting in measures of overall consonant strength. These measures are then analyzed with Bayesian linear mixed effects regression (using weakly informative priors and maximal random effects structures) in order to obtain distributional information about both populations and individual speakers. In the first experiment, word-medial intervocalic /s/ and /f/ are compared for Valladolid Spanish and Barcelona Catalan. Both Catalan and Spanish have the fricatives /s/ and /f/, neither has /v/ contrasting with /f/, and only Catalan has /z/ contrasting with /s/. The results show that Catalan /s/ is stronger than Spanish /s/, but there is no evidence for a difference between the two language’s /f/ strengths, with strong evidence that the magnitude of the difference between Catalan and Spanish /s/ is larger than the magnitude of the difference between Catalan and Spanish /f/. I argue that these results are consistent with a role for contrast preservation as a constraint, with Catalan having stronger /s/ than Spanish because lenition of Catalan /s/ causes phonetic overlap with a contrasting phoneme, while lenition of Spanish /s/ does not. In the second experiment, the simultaneous lenition of Spanish intervocalic /ptk/ and /bdg/ in three dialects (Cuzco, Peru; Lima, Peru; and Valladolid, Spain) is examined. Cuzco is found to have the strongest productions for both /ptk/ and /bdg/, Lima the weakest for both, and Valladolid in between for both. That is, the same hierarchy of strength applies in both cases, though the evidence for the difference between Valladolid and Lima /ptk/ is considerably weaker than the evidence for the other differences. I argue that the results are consistent with constraints on multivariate variation at the dialectal level, but that further research is required to see how constraints at the individual level relate to population differences. Examining individual variation in both experiments, I find that the degree to which an individual speaker lenites /f/ is correlated with the degree to which they lenite /s/, and that the degree to which they lenite /ptk/ is correlated with both the degree to which they lenite /bdg/ and the degree to which they lenite /sf/. These correlations represent a significant constraint on individual phonetic variation from a multivariate perspective. While a connection between individuals’ /ptk/ and /bdg/ lenitions can be explained by both the constraint and outcome views of contrast preservation, the correlation between /sf/ and /ptk/ and the correlation between /s/ and /f/ lend support to the outcome view, and Catalan having stronger /s/ than Spanish but not stronger /f/ lends support to the constraint view. I argue for a framework in which acoustic lenition in a variety of intervocalic consonants may share a common articulatory source of lenition, giving rise to constraints on individual phonetic variation that may lead to contrast preservation as an outcome, but where there may additionally be a role for contrast preservation as a constraint. I conclude by discussing the importance of further acoustic studies that use the methodologies employed here, and studies that explore the articulatory and perceptual implications of the results. In the first experiment, word-medial intervocalic /s/ and /f/ are compared for Valladolid Spanish and Barcelona Catalan. Both Catalan and Spanish have the fricatives /s/ and /f/, neither has /v/ contrasting with /f/, and only Catalan has /z/ contrasting with /s/. The results show that Catalan /s/ is stronger than Spanish /s/, but there is no evidence for a difference between the two language’s /f/ strengths, with strong evidence that the magnitude of the difference between Catalan and Spanish /s/ is larger than the magnitude of the difference between Catalan and Spanish /f/. I argue that these results are consistent with a role for contrast preservation as a constraint, with Catalan having stronger /s/ than Spanish because lenition of Catalan /s/ causes phonetic overlap with a contrasting phoneme, while lenition of Spanish /s/ does not. In the second experiment, the simultaneous lenition of Spanish intervocalic /ptk/ and /bdg/ in three dialects (Cuzco, Peru; Lima, Peru; and Valladolid, Spain) is examined. Cuzco is found to have the strongest productions for both /ptk/ and /bdg/, Lima the weakest for both, and Valladolid in between for both. That is, the same hierarchy of strength applies in both cases, though the evidence for the difference between Valladolid and Lima /ptk/ is considerably weaker than the evidence for the other differences. I argue that the results are consistent with constraints on multivariate variation at the dialectal level, but that further research is required to see how constraints at the individual level relate to population differences. Examining individual variation in both experiments, I find that the degree to which an individual speaker lenites /f/ is correlated with the degree to which they lenite /s/, and that the degree to which they lenite /ptk/ is correlated with both the degree to which they lenite /bdg/ and the degree to which they lenite /sf/. These correlations represent a significant constraint on individual phonetic variation from a multivariate perspective. While a connection between individuals’ /ptk/ and /bdg/ lenitions can be explained by both the constraint and outcome views of contrast preservation, the correlation between /sf/ and /ptk/ and the correlation between /s/ and /f/ lend support to the outcome view, and Catalan having stronger /s/ than Spanish but not stronger /f/ lends support to the constraint view. I argue for a framework in which acoustic lenition in a variety of intervocalic consonants may share a common articulatory source of lenition, giving rise to constraints on individual phonetic variation which may lead to contrast preservation as an outcome, but where there may additionally be a role for contrast preservation as a constraint. I conclude by discussing the importance of further acoustic studies which use the methodologies employed here, and studies which explore the articulatory and perceptual implications of the results.
  • Probabilistic latent variable models for knowledge discovery and optimization
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Wang, Xiaolong
    Description
    I conduct a systematic study of probabilistic latent variable models (PLVMs) with applications to knowledge discovery and optimization. Probabilistic modeling is a principled means to gain insight of data. By assuming that the observed data are generated from a distribution, we can estimate its density, or the statistics of our interest, by either Maximum Likelihood Estimation or Bayesian inference, depending on whether there is a prior distribution for the parameters of the assumed data distribution. One of the primary goals of various machine learning/data mining models is to reveal the underlying knowledge of observed data. A common practice is to introduce latent variables, which are modeled together with the observations. Such latent variables compute, for example, the class assignments (labels), the cluster membership, as well as other unobserved measurements of the data. Besides, proper exploitation of latent variables facilities the optimization itself, which leads to computationally efficient inference algorithms. In this thesis, I describe a range of applications where latent variables can be leveraged for knowledge discovery and efficient optimization. Works in this thesis demonstrate that PLVMs are a powerful tool for modeling incomplete observations. Through incorporating latent variables and assuming that the observations such as citations, pairwise preferences as well as text are generated following tractable distributions parametrized by the latent variables, PLVMs are flexible and effective to discover knowledge in data mining problems, where the knowledge is mathematically modelled as continuous or discrete values, distributions or uncertainty. In addition, I also explore PLVMs for deriving efficient algorithms. It has been shown that latent variables can be employed as a means for model reduction and facilitates the computation/sampling of intractable distributions. Our results lead to algorithms which take advantage of latent variables in probabilistic models. We conduct experiments against state-of-the-art models and empirical evaluation shows that our proposed approaches improve both learning performance and computational efficiency.
  • In search of three-dimensional learning: using self-study to change a secondary biology teacher’s practice
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Henigman, Darin Scott
    Description
    The purpose of this research project was to provide a model for traditional teachers who want to change their practice using self-study research when professional development is unavailable. Issues and tensions that arise when transitioning from a traditionally taught secondary biology unit to a unit that is more in alignment with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) are explored. Data collection included using field notes, critical friend’s conversations and feedback, video and audio recordings, Educators Evaluating the Quality of Instructional Products (EQuIP) rubric unit evaluations, self-study personal history and class portrait, concept maps, tag clouds, and student work. Data analysis compared the changes in practice that occurred between the enactment of a traditionally taught secondary biology unit, and an instructional unit developed by Project NEURON at the University of Illinois. Changes in teacher understanding of the NGSS, classroom dynamics, curricular alignment with the NGSS, and three-dimensional learning are discussed. The self-study concludes that teacher change can occur using in-depth, critical reflections on practice. Traditional teachers who want to transition to the NGSS and three-dimensional instruction can benefit from the findings of this study. Tensions and issues surrounding science education reforms can give valuable insights to science educators in anticipation of the transition to the NGSS.
  • Characteristics of leadership styles and program development among African American males at the University of Illinois...
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Cross, Joseph Leanthony
    Description
    If there is to be representation in which both college administration and faculty mirror the nation’s demographics, then it must be assured that Black males have equal opportunity for access and affordability to attain degree completion. Black male students interested in success have much to learn from Black men who have actually been successful. Leadership is an attitude, behavior, personality, and mind-set of bringing a group of people together to reach a common goal. Leadership is just one way to ensure competitiveness and progress in education, as well as in the units within higher educational institutions. The purpose of this study is to compare the transformational, transactional, servant-leader, and visionary leadership characteristics of five African American male senior administrators and the common characteristics that have made the programs they have developed a success at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. This qualitative research is an analysis of African American male leaders at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the impact of their leadership on the institution. The research specifically identifies five African American males who have been employed with the University of Illinois for at least twenty years and have held senior administrative positions. The findings seek to understand how these African American males developed valued programs at the institution. The quotes within the findings were used in an attempt to provide a more detailed picture of the participant’s lived experiences.
  • Perceptions of typically developing children in India about their siblings with disabilities
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Bhattashali, Ankita
    Description
    In India, people with disabilities often struggle to access various opportunities and resources. Because of the Indian culture around acceptance of disabilities, family members may face social, financial, and emotional difficulties or hardships. Having a child with a disability in the family may lead to strained sibling relationships. Often siblings have little knowledge about disabilities, and may feel ostracized by friends, extended family members, and neighbors. The purpose of this study was to examine the knowledge and attitudes of 12 Indian children regarding their younger siblings with disabilities, including their perceptions about disabilities against the backdrop of societal attitudes and perceptions. Siblings of children with disabilities were interviewed to understand their knowledge about their siblings’ disabilities, to examine their relationships with their siblings, and to assess how the school and society played a role in influencing their perceptions about disabilities. Results from this exploratory study can help parents and other family members understand how disability shapes relationships between children. The findings also provide Indian policy makers and program directors with information that might help them better support families.
  • Into the fold: security fears and power sharing, the credible commitment of rebel military integration and durable peace
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Martin, Matthew Christopher
    Description
    The challenges to peace following civil conflicts are many. Following peaceful negotiations to end the conflict, the state’s goal is to regain its monopoly over the use of violence within its borders. This requires the rebel groups to disarm, demobilize, and reintegrate (DDR) back into society, leaving them vulnerable to renewed violence by the state. The government can attempt to reduce the severity of this credible commitment problem by including power-sharing mechanism in the peace agreement. One such power-sharing mechanism is the integration of rebel fighters into the national military. I argue that this military integration provides the disarming group the ability to provide their own security as well as sanction the government if it fails to hold up its side of the agreement, thereby reducing the chance of agreement failure. A popular alternative to address the problem is the use of peacekeepers to provide security and improve the government’s credible commitment. As I show in this study, the involvement of peacekeepers brings its own challenges and problems, negatively affecting the credible commitment and durable peace. This study combines a quantitative analysis of military integration provisions with a two-by-two qualitative case comparison. Using the unique dataset that I created based on the UCDP Peace Agreement Dataset (Harbom et al. 2006, Högbladh 2012), I found that military integration of rebel fighters was just as successful, if not more so, than deploying peacekeepers; and, it was more effective than just performing DDR alone. Performing both a cross-case and within-case comparison of military integration and peacekeeping, I found that the challenges to third party interventions, especially peacekeepers, can delay the onset of a durable peace. Power-sharing reduces the chance of agreement failure, but providing an effective security mechanism in addition to addressing the grievances is both necessary and sufficient to achieve a durable peace.
  • System identification for development of distributed electric propulsion vertical take-off vehicles
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Patterson, Andrew Paul
    Description
    This thesis presents a complete procedure for estimating the inertia matrix of a multi-rotor vertical take-off and landing vehicle. The procedure starts with an overview of vehicle dynamics. An estimator and a controller are introduced based on these dynamics, which can be tuned to the desired performance specifications. Once the vehicle is flying, data is collected and system identification starts. Several methods of inertia estimation are covered that are simple to implement but still take into account the constraints of symmetry in the inertia matrix. A new method of calculating the inertia is then introduced, which takes in the additional constraint of non-negativity. Each of these methods is compared using multi-sine test inputs generated to optimize performance without driving the system unstable. Finally, both simulation and implementation results are provided. Though inertia estimation is common, the method presented in this thesis is cost effective, requiring almost no extra measurement equipment; it is algorithmically simple, using only the necessary computations; and this thesis completely describes the steps necessary to implement and estimate a vehicle’s inertia.
  • Improvements to power system dynamic load model parameter estimation
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Guo, Siming
    Description
    Transient stability analysis is becoming increasingly important for power systems engineers and researchers. Accurate dynamic models are required, but aggregate load models are an area of weakness. Measurement-based system identification methods based on least-squares minimization have difficulty uniquely identifying the model parameters because the models exhibit parameter insensitivity and interdependency: vastly different model parameters can produce the same output waveform for a given disturbance. One could argue that the parameters of a model are unimportant, as long as the simulation output waveforms are correct. While this is true for the training set — the disturbance(s) we used to determine the parameters — we show that, when measurement noise exists, the model fails when we try to use it to predict the result of other disturbances. We present three methods for reducing the effect of parameter unidentifiability. First, we try increasing the size of the training data to include multiple disturbances, but this does not have a significant impact. Second, we present an algorithm based on a maximum a-posteriori (MAP) estimator, which can take advantage of prior knowledge of the parameters of the grid. The MAP estimator is both more accurate and more robust than least squares. Third, we make use of complex power measurements in addition to voltage. Complex power was found to be much more robust to noise, but many more monitoring devices would need to be deployed to provide the necessary measurements. We also consider the practical computational aspects of large-scale parameter estimation. We propose a geographical region of influence method to define zones where lower resolution models could be substituted to reduce the computational burden. We then investigate alternative metrics for defining the difference between two time series, because the Euclidean distance was shown to be inadequate.
  • Near-data scheduling for data centers with multiple levels of data locality
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Yekkehkhany, Ali
    Description
    Data locality is a fundamental issue for data-parallel applications. Considering MapReduce in Hadoop, the map task scheduling part requires an efficient algorithm which takes data locality into consideration; otherwise, the system may become unstable under loads inside the system's capacity region and jobs may experience longer completion times which are not of interest. The data chunk needed for any map task can be in memory, on a local disk, in a local rack, in the same cluster or even in another data center. Hence, unless there has been much work on improving the speed of data center networks, different levels of service rates still exist for a task depending on where its data chunk is saved and from which server it receives service. Most of the theoretical work on load balancing is for systems with two levels of data locality including the Pandas algorithm by Xie et al. and the JSQ-MW algorithm by Wang et al., where the former is both throughput and heavy-traffic optimal, while the latter is only throughput optimal, but heavy-traffic optimal in only a special traffic load. We show that an extension of the JSQ-MW algorithm for a system with thee levels of data locality is throughput optimal, but not heavy-traffic optimal for all loads, only for a special traffic scenario. Furthermore, we show that the Pandas algorithm is not even throughput optimal for a system with three levels of data locality. We then propose a novel algorithm, Balanced-Pandas, which is both throughput and heavy-traffic optimal. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first theoretical work on load balancing for a system with more than two levels of data locality. This is more challenging than two levels of data locality as a dilemma between performance and throughput emerges.
  • Liturgical jazz: the lineage of the subgenre in the music of Edgar E. Summerlin
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Cordoba, Derick
    Description
    This dissertation discusses the lineage of liturgical jazz with a particular focus on Edgar Eugene “Ed” Summerlin (1928-2006). This lineage stretches back into the late 1950s, but has largely been unexplored beyond a select few high-profile artists. I trace the evolution of liturgical jazz from several composers’ earliest attempts to the present day. Although the liturgical jazz movement began in the late 1950s, it was primarily a product of the turbulent 1960s in America. This was a period of great change and exploration not only in jazz but in organized religion as well. A deep and frank discussion emerged as to what liturgical music should and would be allowed to sound like. These decisions at the highest levels of denominations had ramifications that are still being felt today in the churches of America; however, the primary focus of this dissertation is on the formative period of liturgical jazz during the 1960s and early 1970s. These years give a basis for better understanding and appreciating the development and defining features of liturgical jazz. Summerlin is a figure that is often cited as a pioneer in liturgical jazz, but no one has offered a history of his life, his music, or why his liturgical music was so revolutionary. This dissertation gives an extensive history of Summerlin and his music. It also creates a clear timeline of the early formation and evolution of this subgenre of jazz.
  • The Tonkünstler-Societät and the oratorio in Vienna, 1771–1798
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Wuchner, Emily M.
    Description
    Vienna’s Tonkünstler-Societät (Musician's Society) was established in 1771 with the primary goal of cultivating a pension fund to financially assist the widows and orphans of deceased members. Founded by the Habsburg Kapellmeister Florian Gassmann, the Society generated its income by soliciting dues, collecting donations, and organizing bi-yearly academies held during Lent and Advent. These concerts typically featured newly-composed oratorios written specifically for the Society by such eminent composers as Joseph Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Antonio Salieri, and Carl Ditters von Dittersdorf. The Society is considered to be one of Vienna’s earliest public concert institutes, and its bi-yearly academies are an integral facet of the organization’s identity throughout the eighteenth century. Despite its significance in eighteenth-century Viennese music and history, the Tonkünstler-Societät is often overlooked in scholarship. This dissertation explores the Tonkünstler-Societät from 1771 until 1798, primarily its founding and organization, the academies it sponsored, and the repertoire it commissioned. In Chapter 1, I consider how the Society fits into the broader networks of social welfare and concert life in Europe and Vienna. Looking at the Society in this socio-political context reveals how the group compared to other Viennese pension societies as well as its organization and financial operations. The Society generated substantial income from its academies, which attracted some of the wealthiest Viennese citizens. My work in Chapter 2 explores the Society’s performances, particularly through venues, musical ensembles, ticket sales, expenses, and concert culture. Careful study of the Society’s programming reveals that the organization had its audience in mind when commissioning and planning its repertoire. In my final chapters, I turn to the repertoire to show how the organization appealed to public preference and, perhaps, communicated its own agenda. Over the course of twenty-five years, the oratorio underwent several structural and textural changes to align with the popular operatic traditions of the period, which is seen through works including Gassmann’s La Betulia liberata, Haydn’s Il ritorno di Tobia, Maximilian Ulbrich’s Die Israeliten in der Wüste, and Leopold Kozeluch’s Moisè in Egitto. Near the end of the century, however, the Society nearly abandoned the genre altogether and instead favored miscellaneous programs with cantatas, such as Salieri’s La Riconoscenza and Franz Xavier Süssmayr’s Der Retter in Gefahr. With this dissertation, I shed new light on the Tonkünstler-Societät’s significance in eighteenth-century Viennese social and concert life, while also providing a fresh look at the oratorio genre.
  • Electronic device fabrication and characterization based on two-dimensional materials
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Yang, Zhengfeng
    Description
    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted extensive attention due to their unique and remarkable properties, such as the atomically thin body, pristine surface free of dangling bonds, tunable bandgap, and reasonably high mobility, which make 2D materials promising candidates for novel electronic and optoelectronic devices in low power, high performance and flexible applications. In this thesis, the optical and electrical properties of MoS2/WS2 heterostructures grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are studied. By using Raman spectra, photoluminescence (PL) spectra and atomic force microscopy (AFM), the vertical and lateral MoS2/WS2 structures are identified. The transistors and Hall-bar devices based on vertical monolayer-MoS2/monolayer-WS2 heterostructures are successfully fabricated. The devices show typical n-channel characteristics, indicating that MoS2 and WS2 are naturally n-type doped. Due to the type II band alignment and sharp interface, these vertical and lateral MoS2/WS2 heterostructures can potentially be used for tunneling field-effect transistors and high-speed photodetectors. In addition, the crystal orientation and electronic transport in germanium selenide (GeSe) are also studied. The crystallographic direction of the GeSe is determined by angle-resolved polarized Raman measurement. The anisotropic electronic transport of the GeSe is measured by angle-resolved DC electrical conductance. The results indicate that GeSe has a prominent anisotropic electronic transport with maximum conductance likely along the armchair direction. The anisotropic conductance in GeSe may enable a new series of electronic and optoelectronic devices such as plasmonic devices with resonance frequency continuously tunable with light polarization direction, and high-efficiency thermoelectric devices. In summary, the MoS2/WS2 heterostructures and anisotropic electronic transport in GeSe have been studied. The knowledge gained in these projects will be essential for designing and fabricating novel electronic devices based on these materials in the future.
  • A low-cost, portable, web-based impedance spectroscope for agricultural applications
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Yoo, Seokchan
    Description
    Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is an electrochemical characterization technique widely exploited in the field of chemistry, material science, and biology. EIS characterizes the dynamics of fixed and mobile charge carriers at the electrode-sample interface. It has proved useful in the characterization of electrochemical properties of diverse materials, including electrolytic media and biological tissues. Traditionally, an EIS spectroscope consists of a bulky and expensive electronic system, and handling this equipment can be difficult without proper training. These limitations forestall EIS spectroscopy to be employed for in-field and mobile agricultural applications. To overcome these issues, a low-cost, mobile, web-based EIS spectroscopy device was developed based on the AD5933, a high precision impedance measurement system-on-chip. A user-friendly web application was programmed to promote ease of use and operational simplicity. Application of the developed spectroscope as demonstrated through four different experiments; measuring standard RC circuits, monitoring copper corrosion, detecting adulterated milk and characterizing the estrous cycle of sows. Based on results from these experiments, it was found that the spectroscope is capable of producing accurate data as well as capturing different electrochemical characteristics for agricultural applications. Most importantly, the spectroscope shows its potential to be used as a decision-making tool to optimize artificial insemination in swine breeding operations.
  • Improving Motivation and Engagement in Core Engineering Courses with Student Teams
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Trenshaw, Kathryn Faye
    Description
    Team-based projects are common in capstone engineering design courses and increasingly common in first-year engineering programs. Despite high enrollments and budget cutbacks affecting many programs, second- and third-year students can also benefit from team-based project experiences, which motivate them to succeed in engineering and prepare them for a globally competitive workforce. My dissertation research demonstrates that team design projects can be incorporated into the curricula of engineering departments, and these projects result in positive affective outcomes for students. Using ABET outcomes and Self Determination Theory (SDT) as the background for my studies, I investigated students’ confidence, motivation, and sense of community after experiencing team design projects in two different engineering departments at a large public institution. In the first study, I used a sequential mixed methods approach with a primary quantitative phase followed by an explanatory qualitative phase to evaluate a chemical engineering program that integrated team design projects throughout the curriculum. The evaluation methods included a survey based on desired ABET outcomes for students and focus groups to expand on the quantitative results. Students reported increased confidence in their design, teamwork, and communication skills after completing the projects. In my second and third studies, I used qualitative interviews based on SDT to explore student motivation in an electrical and computer engineering course redesigned to support students’ intrinsic motivation to learn. SDT states that intrinsic motivation to learn is supported by increasing students’ sense of autonomy, competence, and relatedness in regard to their learning. Using both narrative inquiry and phenomenological methodologies, I analyzed data from interviews of students for mentions of autonomy, competence, and relatedness as well as course events that were critical in changing students’ motivation. Analysis revealed that individual choice, constructive failures, and a strong sense of community in the classroom were critical to moving students toward intrinsic motivation. Further, community building through team experiences characterized the essence of the student experience in the course. My research highlights a need for better quantitative measures of students’ affective outcomes, specifically motivation, in the context of a single course. Based on the results of my studies, SDT should be reevaluated in terms of possible interdependencies between autonomy, competence, and relatedness, and how the social context of large engineering courses may create a deeper need for supporting relatedness.
  • How Demographics Affect Student Major Choice
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Dugas, Taylor
    • McCormick, Anna
    • Callejas,Alejandro
    • Khan, Samar
    Description
    For many students, the choice of major in college is the first big decision made. Our group wants to better understand how socioeconomic standing, race, and parental involvement influence these decisions for students. We wanted to understand the correlation between these factors and major choice as well as overall satisfaction as a result of that choice. To do this, we collected quantitative and qualitative data from University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign students through online surveys and focus groups. From our research we were able to determine that there is reason to believe that parental involvement in a student’s life is one of the biggest factors that influences major choice.
  • Liver Organoid Assembly for Toxicity Assessment of Silver Nanoparticles
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Park, Jooyen
    • Sullivan, Kathryn M.
    • Kong, Hyunjoon
    • Bidon, Miya K.
    Description
    Due to their interaction with water, nanoparticles experience a compounding cycle of being absorbed in multiple organisms, most notably commercial fish and humans. The purpose of this research is to assemble clusters of hepatic cells to enable the assessment of the toxicity levels of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). For this analysis, we cultured liver cancer cells (HepG2) into decellularized MSC matrices onto non-adherent surfaces to maintain cellular phenotype, increase cell proliferation, and promote high differentiation potential. Based on this research, spheroid MSC-DCM has shown to provide more physiologically relevant conditions to enhance the growth and detoxification activity of liver cancer cells. From this, we were able to quantitatively and qualitatively analyze the increased toxicity levels of AgNPs between size 40 and 130 nm.
  • Melodies and Memories
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Getz, Lowell L.
    Description
    When we reach an advanced age, there are a number of songs that bring back memories of specific phases of our life. Melodies that were popular during those times became indelibly associated with how we felt as we lived the times--the sights and senses we associate with those long ago years. When we hear them played now, we take a nostalgic trip back down memory lane, mentally reliving years associated with the songs. Here, I describe the memories of the major phases of my life that are brought to mind when I hear specific melodies.
  • Anti-Oppression Workshop Series at the University Library
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Caragher, Kristyn
    Description
    The idea for the Anti-Oppression Workshop Series was first conceived by Caragher in the fall of 2015 and was actualized in the spring of 2016 through institutional support from Lori Mestre, the University Library Diversity Committee, and the University Library Administrative Council at the University of Illinois.The Anti-Oppression Workshop Series report chronicles the goals, processes and challenges, design and implementation of the series. The origin of the concept of diversity, as well as policies like Affirmative Action and Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) legislation, are discussed in the report as setting the stage for more emphasis being placed on valuing difference and less emphasis on resisting oppression in efforts to achieve racial parity (or justice). Caragher makes a call for using anti-oppressive and anti-racist language and policies in order to address the systems of oppression that have contributed to hostile environments for People of Color within the field of library and information science. Finally, Caragher reflects on lessons learned and offers next steps for libraries interested in integrating anti-oppressive workshops and practices into their respective institutions.