University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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Showing 121–160 of 2,299,911 items
  • Rapid Scan Versus Coherent Doppler Radar for A.S.W.
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Sherwin, C.W.
    • Ruina, J.P.
    Description
    Control Systems Laboratory changed its name to Coordinated Science Laboratory
  • Evaluation of the Icon I (JNS) Control Program
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Murray, Albert E.
    Description
    Control Systems Laboratory changed its name to Coordinated Science Laboratory
  • Censoring with a Video Mapper
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Murray, Albert E.
    Description
    Control Systems Laboratory changed its name to Coordinated Science Laboratory
  • DEPEND: A Simulation-Based Environment for System Level Dependability Analysis
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Iyer, Ravishankar K.
    • Goswami, Kumar K.
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • A Minimum Area VLSI Architecture for O(logn) Time Sorting
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Bilardi, G.
    • Preparata, F.P.
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • Controllability, Pole Placement and Stabilizability in Large Scale Composite Systems
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Özgüner, Ü.
    • Perkins, W.R.
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • Steps into Computational Geometry
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Preparata, F.P.
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • Scalar Queue Conversion: Dynamic Single Assignment for Concurrent Scheduling
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Amarasinghe, Saman
    • Frank, Matthew I.
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • Dynamic Model of a Continuous Cold Rolling Mill
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Jamshidi, M.
    • Kokotović, P.
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • Parameter Adaptive Control for a Class of Nonlinear Systems
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Taylor, David G.
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • Use of Switch Time Sensitivities to Provide Near Optimal Control
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Stefanek, R.G.
    • Cruz, J.B., Jr.
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • Semi-Topological Analysis of Linear Networks
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Kamae, T.
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • An Approximate Design of Optimal Regulators for High-Order Linear Plants
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Kokotović, P.
    • Sannuti, P.
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • A Constraint Mapping Technique for System Organization
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Kahne, Stephen J.
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory changed its name from Control Systems Laboratory
  • A Photo-Current Suppressor Gauge for the Measurement of Very Low Pressures
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Schuemann, W.C.
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory changed its name from Control Systems Laboratory
  • Efficient Parallel Circuits and Algorithms for Division
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Ramachandran, Vijaya
    • Shankar, Narayan
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • Getting the Gist: A Computational Theory of Sentence Understanding
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Nakajima, Shigeki
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • Dependability Analysis of Parallel Systems Using a Simulation-Based Approach
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Sawyer, Darren Charles
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • New Algorithms for Sequential Diagnosis
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Khanna, Sanjeev
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • Statistical Power Estimation for Sequential CMOS Circuits
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Saxena, Vikram
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • Analytic Solutions to Some Stochastic, Adaptive, and Dual Optimal Control Problems for Economic Decision Making
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Popović, Bojan
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory changed its name from Control Systems Laboratory
  • Delay Fault Testing for Enhanced Full Scan Based Circuits
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Sharma, Manish
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • The Adhesion, Friction, and Wear of Sputtered Titanium Carbide Coatings on Polished Steel Substrates
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Wu, Lawrence Ching-Yu
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • Translation and Simulation of Structural VHDL for the DEPEND Simulation Environment
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Kraljevic, Tom Mikael
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • Algorithms for Min-Max Problems in Hilbert Spaces
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Hecht, Robert Wayne
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • What Should I Do Next? How Advanced Engineering Students Decide Their Post-Baccalaureate Plans
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Jiang, Anwen
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • Zeros of Multivariable Systems: Definitions and Algorithms
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Lindner, Douglas Kent
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • The Restricted Stackelberg Problem
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Wen, John Ting-Yung
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • A Parallel Algorithm for Switch-Level Timing Simulation on a Hypercube Multiprocessor
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Rao, Hariprasad Nannapaneni
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • Estimation for Uncertain Linear Systems with Jump Parameters
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Tugnait, Jitendra Kumar
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory changed its name from Control Systems Laboratory
  • A Simulation Program with Latency Exploitation and Node Tearing
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Yu, Tat Kwan Edgar
    Description
    Coordinated Science Laboratory was formerly known as Control Systems Laboratory
  • Heavy-metal-free colloidal nanocrystal heterostructures – synthetic chemistry and growth mechanisms
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Zhai, You
    Description
    Building heterostructures of colloidal nanocrystals by bringing different components into contact can improve existing or impart novel properties, which enables applications as light emitters in already-commercialized and near-future products. However, the majority of the research has been based on compositions with heavy metals (e.g., cadmium or lead) posing toxicity concerns to the consumers. Therefore, a better understanding of the synthetic chemistry and the growth mechanisms for heavy-metal-free nanocrystal heterostructures is critical before their commercialization potential becomes reality. Here, we have developed novel synthetic strategies to achieve the anisotropic growth of colloidal nanocrystals and the introduction of multiple components with tunability of their positions in the heterostructures, as well as to improve the photoluminescence quantum yield (PL QY) of nanocrystals. We first examine how different Cu precursors in the synthesis of colloidal copper sulfide (Cu2-xS) nanocrystals affect the resulting shape and phase. Decreasing aspect ratio in 1D nanorods (eventually transitioning to 2D nanodisks) observed is consistent with the expected effects of decreasing Cu precursor reactivity. Nanorods are predominantly chalcocite at the early stages of growth but a phase transition to djurleite occurs accompanied by a change in tip faceting upon further growth. In contrast, nanodisks appear in the djurleite phase early on and remain so upon continued growth. Secondly, the high copper vacancy density and the high cation mobility in the Cu2-xS nanorods favor cation exchange, and the remaining Cu2-xS after partial cation exchange can serve as the catalyst for the subsequent solution-liquid-solid (SLS)-like growth. The interplay between cation exchange and SLS-like growth leads to tapered rod-rod, body/tail, or barbell-like Cu2-xS/ZnS heterostructures, which can be controlled by the Zn precursor and ligand choice. Finally, using a similar procedure, spontaneous multiple segment formation has been achieved in Cu2-xS/CuGaS2 heterostructured nanorods for the first time. Large strain due to lattice mismatch (-7.4% in the axial direction and -10.6% in the other direction) is responsible, because such segmentation is absent in Cu2-xS/CuInS2 heterostructured nanorods with a smaller mismatch (-4.3% in the axial direction and -6.5% in the other direction). More importantly, ligands with a large steric hindrance are critical to the multiple segment formation, which pack less densely on the surface and enables nucleation in the middle of the nanorods. In contrast, linear ligands provide better surface protection and the new components tend to form at the tips of the nanorods where the ligand packing density is relatively low. In addition to Cu2-xS-based anisotropic heterostructures, we have also explored how to enhance the PL QY for heavy-metal-free color-center (manganese)-doped nanocrystals and ZnTe-based core/shell nanocrystals with spherical shapes. Annealing or growth at high temperatures for an extended period of time is considered detrimental for the synthesis of high-quality Mn-doped II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals, which can lead to the broadening of size distribution and, more importantly, to the loss of dopants. However, ripening can be beneficial to doping in a simple heat-up approach, where high dopant concentrations can be achieved. Smaller nanocrystals in a reaction batch, on average, exhibit higher undesirable band edge PL and lower desirable dopant PL. The optimization of dopant loss and the removal of such smaller undesirable nanocrystals through Ostwald ripening along with surface exchange/passivation to remove Mn clustering lead to high Mn PL QYs (45 to 55 %) for ZnSxSe1-x, ZnS, CdS, and CdSxSe1-x host nanocrystals. Similar with the synthetic optimization for doped nanocrystals, surface passivation by a high-quality ZnSe shell and a cation-rich surface by Zn-cation treatment enable a high PL QY (~40%) for ZnTe-based nanocrystals. The highly reactive selenium powder provides better synthetic control of the ZnSe shell. In addition, highly reductive ligand (diphenylphosphine) can further increase the PL QY presumably by filling surface electron trap states.
  • Understanding television demand for National Football League: factors influencing sport demand across gender and age...
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Xu, Jie
    Description
    As viewership of sports have become an indispensable part of American culture, understanding the demand for spectator sports has become an essential branch of economic study. Gender and age are two vital demographics that have been addressed in many prior sport management studies. Although previous studies in sport participation reveal the importance of demographics in evaluating sport demand (e.g., Lera-Lopez & Rapun-Garate, 2007; Robinson & Trail, 2005), there are few studies regarding gender differences in sport economics. The purpose of this study is to understand the factors influencing sport demand trends within specific gender and age groups. The main research questions in this study are: “Is there a difference between male and female fans’ sport demand?” “Is there a difference between the demand of younger and older fans?” and “What factors mediate sport demand for different gender and age groups?” Among the mediating factors, this study focused particularly on outcome uncertainty. In this study, based on demand theory in economics, a hedonic model for each demographic (i.e. gender and age) group was developed. The model in this study followed Borland and Macdonald’s (2003) conceptual framework for professional sporting contests. The determinants included four main economic factors, consumer preferences, timing of contest, and characteristics of sport contests. Using the setting of National Football League (NFL) regular season games, telecast demand for each demographic group was estimated. Then comparisons of male and female television viewers, young and adult viewers, and young and older viewers were conducted. Among the meaningful findings, most determinants exerted statistically significant influences on both male and female viewers’ demand. Monday Night Football games and several month dummy variables were not significant in the gender-differentiated demand model. Surprisingly, outcome uncertainty did not play a significant role in either gender’s demand estimations. The comparison study revealed that there are more similarities than differences in the predictors of female and male viewership. In terms of gender-differentiated sport demand, there are several determinants that uniquely impacted female and male broadcast demand. For example, only one month dummy (which indicates the game was played in December and January) and YearTrend variable (Which indicates the season that NFL game was played) were found having significant impacts in female broadcast viewers. Meaningful determinants include the market’s television population size and local team quality, which were two variables that showed statistically significant difference across gender comparisons. With regard to age group differences, most determinants were also found statistically significant in three age groups’ broadcast viewers (i.e., youth, all adults, and older viewers). Moreover, Monday Night Football games and most month-based dummy variables were not significant influences on either youth or all adults’ demand, but those variables played significant roles in older viewers’ demand estimation. The lowest explained variance among these three estimations is the youth cohort’s demand model (45.6%), which means young people’s broadcast demand may be difficult to estimate and in need of further study. Three variables demonstrated significant differences across age groups. Those three salient determinants of age-based trends are local market’s average income, local team tenure and local team quality. One additional variable showed distinct impact on the viewership of youth versus older adults—early-season versus late-season broadcasts. It was found that there were fewer older adult viewers for early season when comparing with late-season games. An unexpected finding was that outcome uncertainty did not play a role in differences between male and female viewership, nor between youth and adult viewers or youth and older adult viewers. The main contribution of this study is developing economic framework for sport estimation delineated by gender and age groups. Moreover, this study’s in-depth view on how differences in determinants impact each group’s demand will improve the understanding of various cohorts’ sports consumption patterns. Empirically, the results of this study also provide the trends of sport consumption based on demographic groups, which would help league to know well of its customers and contribute to making marketing strategies.
  • Incentives in the classroom: performance-based compensation implementation and impact in high performing schools in...
    Scholarship
    Creator
    La Londe, Priya Goel
    Description
    Performance-based compensation is gaining traction in the education systems of countries that lead in the world economy and in comparative international assessments of student achievement. Longstanding and contemporary debates in educational policy and research question the potential of this incentivist policy to improve teaching. Some scholars warn that decades of experimental research have found bonuses yield little or no improvement in various measures of teaching quality and student achievement. Yet, policymakers and performance-pay advocates maintain that financial bonuses will lead to better teaching, student learning, and educational markets. As PBC persists, we remain unaware of how financial bonuses are enacted and shape teaching. To better understand how financial bonuses shape teaching, recent qualitative research has investigated exactly how performance-based compensation unfolds inside of complex school settings. Building on this emerging scholarship, this research examined the implementation of merit pay and its effects on teaching from the perspectives of teachers at School M1, a high performing elementary school in Shanghai. Those who aspire for high ranks in comparative international assessments and other proxies of global economic leadership are turning to regions such as Shanghai for lessons on “what works.” Shanghai thus provided the opportunity to investigate incentivism in a system that has gained global influence yet whose policies and corresponding practices remain understudied. A principal and 20 teachers were interviewed, and a range of policy documents were collected in This qualitative case study. Data were coded according to theory on incentivism, policy enactment, and teacher development. Responses were then further analyzed to determine recurring themes and patterns. I find that state and national policymakers and the M1 Principal intended for PBC to improve teaching quality. However, the M1 teacher participants perceived bonuses were intended to augment base pay, compensate teachers for their existing effort, and to provoke teachers to exert additional effort. Teachers had little understanding of merit pay implementation processes. While merit pay did not erode teacher relationships, and norms of respect and deference to authority guided teachers’ silence on and acceptance of the policy and shaped their participation in policy enactment. They perceived high expectancy, low instrumentality and valence, and they held mixed views on fairness. The majority of teachers suggested their sense of motivation and self-efficacy was driven by a sense of personal responsibility for collective good and by public displays of recognition from their peers and superiors. Teachers suggested that social relationships, professional community, and trust were more efficacious ways to get to improved teacher quality. Overall, teachers perceived bonuses neither inspired instructional improvement compelled their low performing peers to leave the school or the profession. Advocates suggest bonuses motivate educators to behave in desirable ways, incentivize strong teachers to join and stay in the workforce, and force weak teachers to exit. While compelling, this lens ignores how financial incentives operate in the cultural foundations of schools. Additionally, teacher perceptions of bonuses bear directly upon how bonuses are levied in schools. To assess the efficacy of PBC as a school improvement mechanism, this research offers a sorely needed school-level investigation of PBC that explores the perspectives of teachers and is founded in sociocultural lenses on school improvement. In doing so, this research builds on an emerging body of qualitative research that helps assess the prevailing hypothesis that there is a neat relationship between an incentive, teacher practice, and student learning.
  • “We must keep reaching across the table and feed each other” life stories of Black women in academic leadership roles in...
    Scholarship
    Creator
    McMillion, Desiree Y.
    Description
    “Black women have obtained leadership position as administrators at higher education institutions. While previous research has demonstrated that obtaining leadership positions is problematic for Black women, little research focuses solely on the plight and personal agency of Black women administrators”. While there exists a substantial body of literature devoted to examining the ways in which sexism, Anti-Black racism, gender and class inequality shape and limit leadership opportunities for Black women in education, few studies have focused on the personal agency of these women and how it influences their actions with regard to leadership within higher education. This phenomenological study examines the lived experiences of Black women in administrative leadership roles in higher education at predominantly white institutions and how race and gender intersect, and contribute to their career trajectories in academia.
  • The influence of individual and organizational variables on informal learning among nurses in Korean hospitals
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Lee, Da Ye
    Description
    Health professionals work in knowledge organizations where human capital is the most important asset. The development of quality and efficiency in treatment and care depends mainly on the ability of staff to use, refine and learn new knowledge and skills. Learning in hospital settings is both formal and informal. Marsick (2006) suggests that approximately 80 percent of skills in hospital work are learned in informal, day-to-day interaction. Formal learning has been extensively studied, and there are many reports on the design and outcomes of formal continuing professional development for nurses and physicians; however, there are few studies exploring informal learning by nurses. Therefore, the present study identifies the hierarchical linear relationship among informal learning, individual and organizational variables of nurses in hospitals, to empirically demonstrate the personal and organizational factors influencing informal learning while considering the different organizational scales and cultures between hospitals and to determine the extent to which individual nurses engage in informal learning. Regarding individual and organizational level variables, a questionnaire assessed Informal Workplace Learning Outcomes, individual level variables (Task Variety, Task Significance, Friendship with Other Nurses and Learning Motivation), and organizational level variables (Empowerment, Leadership, Perception of Team’s Support, and Openness of Team’s Communication). To collect the data for this study, approximately 2,300 nurses working at 5 medium-to-large-sized Korean hospitals with more than 250 beds were invited to complete the questionnaire survey online. Overall, 218 complete responses were analyzed using One-Way ANOVA and hierarchical linear model (HLM) analysis. Results indicated that individual level variance accounted for 84.6% of total variance and organizational level variance accounted for 15.4% of total variance in informal learning. The effect of individual level variables (task variety, task significance, workplace friendship, and learning motivation), and organizational level variables (empowerment, perception of team's support, and openness of team's communication) about informal learning were significant. Interaction effects of task variety and empowerment, task variety and perception of team's support, task significance and perception of team's support, workplace friendship and openness of team's communication, and learning motivation and perception of team's support on informal learning were found. However, there were no significant differences in nurses’ informal learning outcomes among hospitals. Detailed results and implications of these findings, limitations, and future research suggestions are discussed.
  • Neuronal filopodia borne along tips and shafts of dendrites comprise two distinct populations as evidenced by...
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Jain, Anika
    Description
    Ever since their discovery in 1880 by Ramon y Cajal, dendritic spines have evoked considerable interest in the field of cellular and molecular neuroscience. Subsequent studies into their morphogenesis, and into synaptogenesis, brought into the spotlight their putative precursors – the dendritic filopodia. This set off several lines of investigation into filopodial structure and function, notable among which is the work by Portera-Cailliau et al. who showed in 2003 that growth cone filopodia differ from shaft filopodia in terms of densities and lengths, and in their response to blocking of synaptic transmission, and of ionotropic glutamate receptors. However, they observed these differences only up to postnatal day 5. In 2010, Korobova and Svitkina reported the existence of a different actin organization in shaft filopodia at 10 days in vitro (DIV). This work fills the gap between those two studies, investigating differences between tip and shaft filopodia at 4, 7, 10 and 14 DIV, and examining structure and dynamics, as well as responses to developmental cues, specifically, Semaphorin3A (Sema3A). Using confocal microscopy to visualize filopodial membrane and actin we found that shaft filopodia are shorter than tip filopodia, and show a less dense presentation along the dendrite. We then employed the quantitative phase imaging technology of Spatial Light Interference Microscopy (SLIM) for analysis of mass change dynamics of individual filopodia. We found that tip and shaft filopodia show similar dynamics early on, but further on in development by 7 DIV shaft filopodia slow down considerably while tip filopodia continue to show fast increases and decreases in mass. Further analysis of growth rates showed that both types filopodia exhibit exponential growth during their extension, implying that the bigger the filopodium the faster it grows. Next we sought to examine the functional ramifications of these differences in tip and shaft filopodia. We investigated the differential responses of the two populations to Sema3A. We found that a 24 h exposure to Sema3A at 0-1 DIV leads to accelerated maturation of shaft filopodia as evidenced by (1) an increase in dendritic branching, (2) an acceleration of maturation into spines, and (3) into synapses. An analysis of the underlying dynamics showed that Sema3A treatment results in (1) tip filopodial movement becoming more deterministic, (2) an increase in average growth and shrinkage rates in shaft filopodia, and, (3) an increase in speed of the fastest growth and shrinkage in tip and shaft filopodia at 4 and 7 DIV. Together these findings show that Sema3A is a unique cue that acts on both tip filopodia and shaft filopodia, but with different outcomes – the former to increase dendrite lengths, and the latter to increase branching, spinogenesis and synaptogenesis. Bath application of Sema3A also elicits an axonal response, which might itself affect the cells as a whole, and could confound the filopodial read out. To avoid this, we supplemented bath application studies with investigations using microfluidic devices that enable focal, dendrite specific application of Sema3A, and, also, better replicate the in vivo layered structure of the hippocampus. Our results held true even with this sub-cellular administration of Sema3A. Taken together our findings provide further evidence for differences in the two dendritic filopodial populations – those borne on the tips, and those along the shafts, and help deconstruct the role of Sema3A in dendritic development. A greater comprehension of this diversity in the filopodial population, and its role in shaping the development of neuronal networks will not only further our understanding of the nervous system, but will also help unravel the mechanistic bases of developmental disorders and diseases.
  • Utopian connectivity to paranoid collapse: complex networks and global social ecologies in 20th-century fiction
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Ballard, Shawn C
    Description
    This project treats complex systems, specifically global social and ecological networks, as central to understanding modern explorations and experiences of utopian connectivity and stability alongside dystopian paranoia and precarity. Through an examination of the fiction of Charlotte Perkins Gilman, James Joyce, and David Mitchell, I analyze strengths and vulnerabilities of such systems. Gilman’s perfectly controlled and aggressively managed ecosystems are undercut by potentially catastrophic losses in biodiversity. Joyce’s celebratory view of networks and links across cosmic scales requires an acknowledgement and acceptance of humanity’s relative powerlessness in the face of such universal connections, which dwarf global economic and social networks. Mitchell illustrates how subtle social linkings across time and space can add up to create powerful technological, ecological, and social effects. However, the power in Mitchell’s dense global network is also its weakness; in Ghostwritten, efficiency in information transfer can be used for positive outcomes as well as to effect total apocalypse. Alongside and enmeshed with my analysis of Mitchell’s Ghostwritten, I present a comparison of manual and automatic methods I created for extracting social networks from literary texts as a first step toward developing a broadly applicable network extraction method. My proof of concept indicates that, with further iterations and refinements, it should be possible to establish a practical, reliable, and effective method for extracting and understanding social networks in novels, with the aim of using these models to understand more deeply the texts themselves and what they suggest about human experience, policy, and futurity.
  • 1-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1,2-propandione is a crucial pheromone component of the rare North American cerambycid beetle...
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Diesel, Natalie Marie
    Description
    The compound 1-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1,2-propanedione was recently found to be an important pheromone component of several Asian species of longhorned beetles in the subfamily Cerambycinae. Here, we report the first confirmed identification of this pyrrole as a pheromone component of a cerambycine species native to North America, the rare Dryobius sexnotatus Linsley. Headspace volatiles from males contained (R)-3-hydroxyhexan-2-one and the pyrrole (ratio 1:0.13), neither of which were detected in samples from females. A field bioassay confirmed that adults of both sexes were attracted only by the binary blend of racemic 3-ketol with the pyrrole, and not by either compound alone. Adults of another cerambycine, Xylotrechus colonus (F.), were attracted by the ketol, consistent with its being the primary component of the pheromone of this species, and attraction was not influenced by the presence of the pyrrole. This study attests to the effectiveness of pheromone-baited traps in detecting rarely encountered species of cerambycids. It also provides further evidence that the pyrrole represents another conserved pheromone motif within the Cerambycinae.