University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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Subject
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Showing 241–280 of 2,600,720 items
  • Provide fewer menu options to avoid over-preparation and/or high volumes of leftovers
    Scholarship
    Description
    Some items available in school lunchrooms which are considered “extra foods” of “minimal nutritional value” are not creditable in offer versus serve (OVS) programs. Eliminating such offerings can reduce confusion in pricing and record keeping. Providing fewer menu items creates less waste, can help prevent over-preparation of food or high volumes of leftovers, and helps to focus efforts on the improvement of food items being served.
  • Submit an original lesson plan on diverting food for animal consumption
    Scholarship
    Description
    Raising awareness of the magnitude of the food waste problem and the issues involved among the next generation, and also examining potential solutions with them, helps to ensure that students will integrate desired behaviors and carry them into their decision-making roles in the future. Changing procedures is important for your school today, but changing the mindsets of students is important for our society tomorrow.
  • Do a baseline lunchroom waste characterization (pre waste-free lunch day or policy implementation)
    Scholarship
    Description
    Before making any changes to your lunchroom procedures that result in the reduction food waste, it’s important to get a feel for the types and quantities of waste being generated on a typical day. A baseline waste characterization helps to identify the major categories of waste that need to be addressed. It can also highlight simple changes that you can make to achieve immediate results.
  • Use creative names to encourage interest in trying new foods, choosing vegetables, etc.
    Scholarship
    Description
    Research has shown that the simple act of giving a food selection an interesting, appealing name can increase the amount of that item actually eaten by students. This marketing technique is simple and costs nothing but the time to be creative. If even slightly more of an item is consumed rather than thrown out because of an appealing name, that's a worthwhile return on investment.
  • INHS Reports, Spring 2003
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Illinois Natural History Survey
    Description
    INHS establishes site for organic research | Cave amphipod respiration in southwestern Illinois; Weather radars reveal bird migration patterns | Largemouth bass virus: an emerging fish pathogen | Important note to subscribers | Species spotlight: striped skunk | Naturalist's apprentice: animals make scents--the pheremone game
  • Establish an on-site compost pile
    Scholarship
    Description
    Onsite composting of food waste has multiple benefits. On site composting reduces the amount of waste your institution is required to send to a landfill. Using the compost on the premises returns essential nutrients required for plant growth back to the soil. Additionally, well made compost prevents soil erosion and overall quality of local soil.
  • Store unused foods for representation or repurposing
    Scholarship
    Description
    Ideally, your food service planning should be such that leftover food is at a minimum. However, even well planned operations have unserved foods leftover from time to time due to attendance fluctuations, fluctuations in the number of students bringing their lunch as opposed to partaking of school meals, etc. Properly stored unserved foods may be repurposed to reduce waste and procurement costs.
  • Complete a case study on food waste prevention or reduction activities at your school
    Scholarship
    Description
    Case studies can serve as sources of inspiration or lessons learned for other organizations interested in reducing or preventing food waste. Sometimes the existence of a case study from a school or similar size or resources can help convince stakeholders that implementing a suggested change is possible.
  • Submit an original lesson plan on menu planning and food presentation and how it relates to food waste
    Scholarship
    Description
    Submit an original lesson plan, written by a representative of your school or organization, related to food presentation and how it relates to food waste. The lesson must address reduction of food waste in some way.
  • About The Green Lunchroom Challenge
    Scholarship
    Description
    PDF of the About the Project page of the Green Lunchroom Challenge web site.
  • [Green Lunchroom Challenge] Participants
    Scholarship
    Description
    List of schools that participated in the Green Lunchroom Challenge.
  • Green Lunchroom Challenge Baseline Form
    Scholarship
    Description
    Form for Green Lunchroom Challenge participants to collect baseline facility data.
  • Green Lunchroom Challenge Case Study Template
    Scholarship
    Description
    Template for schools to use to submit case studies to the Green Lunchroom Challenge team.
  • Smarter Lunchrooms Concepts and Food Waste Reduction
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Scrogum, Joy
    • Ajie, Whitney
    Description
    Whitney Ajie of University of Illinois Extension explains how schools can use USDA's Smarter Lunchroom concept to reduce food waste.
  • St. Louis Composting/Total Organics Recycling Services
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Ryan, Sara
    • Scrogum, Joy
    Description
    Sara Ryan of Total Organics Recycling/St. Louis Composting explains how schools can collect food waste for composting.
  • Fabrication of metal-oxide thin-films and features on dissimilar materials via ion-assisted codeposition
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Koyn, Zachariah Taylor
    Description
    The merging of metal oxides and polymers has a number of interesting potential applications that rely on the wettability, optical, and electronic properties of the surface. One challenge in the fabrication of these dissimilar materials is that the heat often used to create oxide nanostructures results in the thermal decomposition of the polymer. This requires creative approaches to successfully merge these materials. Many current approaches involve the separate creation of metal oxide nanostructures, followed by some process of embedding them in an uncured polymer. Previous work has shown that ion beams have been used to sputter deposit metals, pattern polycrystalline metals, controllably oxidize metal surfaces, and induce chemical changes in the surfaces of polymers. Presented here is a single step technique that draws on these, utilizing dual ion beams to deposit, oxidize, and pattern Zn on Si and PDMS. Two ion beams are installed in a perpendicular configuration, with one normal to the substrate surface and the other parallel. The parallel beam passes over the substrate and impinges on a Zn target, sputter depositing the material onto the substrate. Simultaneously, the normal incidence beam impinges on the substrate surface, imparting energy and sputtering both the substrate material and the deposited Zn. The effects of changing the ion beam flux ratio (0.1-2.0), energy (500 eV and 1000 eV), species (Ar+ and O2+ for substrate irradiation, Ar+ for sputter deposition), and fluence (1E17 ions/cm2 and 5E17 ions/cm2) are examined. These factors allow for the comparison of different deposition rates, chemical effects, and surface evolution stages in the synthesis of these functionalized surfaces. Surfaces are characterized by several ex-situ techniques: topography (AFM), chemistry (XPS), and wettability (static contact angle). This technique has yielded a number of interesting surfaces. On Si, the formation of nanodots is seen under many processing parameters. These dots have no ordering, but their size (~20-100 nm diameter) and spatial density (1-100’s um-2) can be controlled by the flux ratio and ion energy. The codeposition on Si at higher total fluence is also shown to induce ripples in the Si surface in addition to the formation of nanodots, as is expected from normal incidence irradiation with the presence of small amounts of surface impurities. XPS has shown that the flux ratio can finely tune the amount of Zn deposited on the surfaces. On PDMS, all cases of irradiation, both with and without codeposition, have results in larger scale wrinkles to form on the surface (wavelength ~500-1000 nm) that are similar to previous work with oxygen plasma immersion. Notably, these are created with both O2+ and Ar+ ion beams. Atop this structure, the formation of nanodots is also seen. Again, these are not shown to have spatial ordering, but are larger than those seen on Si, ~75-200 nm diameter. These form at fewer combinations of processing parameters and are seen to preferentially grown in the valleys of the wrinkle pattern, specifically as they get larger. The ability to control the size and density of nanodots on PDMS with processing parameters is less clear than on Si. This work represents a relatively fast, scalable, low-temperature, single-step process to grow and functionalize metal-oxide nanostructures on polymers. The ability to functionalize flexible, transparent substrates with metal-oxide nanostructures offers exciting applications in areas such as flexible and wearable electronics, gas sensors, biosensors, and photonics.
  • INHS Reports, Spring 2007
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Illinois Natural History Survey
    Description
    Will the Emerging Bioeconomy Add to the Burden of Invasive Species Management? | The Black-Crowned Night-Herons of Lake Calumet Part II: Foraging Ecology and Contaminant Exposure | Establishment of Historic Fish Communities to Restored Illinois River Floodplain Lakes | Endangered and Threatened Plant Species Database | Exploring the Potential Influence of Fish Diversity as a Determinant of Ecosystem Properties in Aquatic Food Webs | Species Spotlight: Spring Ephermerals | The Naturalist's Apprentice: Field Marks of Illinois Butterflies
  • INHS Reports, Summer 2002
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Illinois Natural History Survey
    Description
    New Endowment Honors INHS Researcher | Some Recent Changes in the Illinois Flora | Effectiveness of Crop Rotation on Corn Rootworms | Emerging Issues in Catch-and-Release Angling | What Happened to the Franklin's Ground Squirrel? | Species Spotlight: Caddisflies | Naturalist's Apprentice: Build a Caddifly Larva and Case
  • INHS Reports, Spring 2001
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Illinois Natural History Survey
    Description
    Exotic Species Education and Outreach | Fruit Complementarity in Feeding Birds | Applying Geographic Information Systems Technology to the Ecological Risk Assessment Process in Illinois | Physiological Telemetry in Fisheries Research | Illinois Wilds Institute for Nature Summer 2001 Class Schedule | Illinois Habitats Poster Series: Two New Posters
  • INHS Reports, May/June 2000
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Illinois Natural History Survey
    Description
    The Easter Massasauga at Carlyle Lake | New Predators and Parasites of Earthworms in Illinois | New Predator Invades the Great Lakes | Smallmouth Bass and Artificial Reefs in Lake Michigan | Filling the GAP to Map Biodiversity in Illinois | Species Spotlight: American Robin | The Naturalist's Apprentice: Robin Crossword Puzzle
  • INHS Reports, Spring 2009
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Illinois Natural History Survey
    Description
    A Long-standing Tradition in Springtail Systematics at INHS | Flocks of Birds Out of Visual Contact? | Checkout our Upcoming Publications Calendar Sales Specials | Impacts of Temperature and Dissolved Oxygen Stressors on Large-mouth Bass | Science in a Web 2.0 World | Species Spotlight: Yellow Bellwort | The Naturalist's Apprentice: The Acrostic Poem
  • INHS Reports, Winter 2008
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Illinois Natural History Survey
    Description
    Evaluating Waterbird Use of Wetlands Restored through the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program | Sharing Biodiversity Data: Opportunities for Collaboration | Bioenergetics of Invasive Asian Carps | Recent INHS Publications and Educational Materials | Species Spotlight: Long-eared Owl | The Naturalist's Apprentice: Dissect an Owl Pellet
  • Ground-water recharge and runoff in Illinois
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Walton, William Clarence
    Description
    Recharge conditions in several areas of northeastern Illinois are described, and recharge rates for several aquifers in central and southern Illinois are given. Recharge rates to deeply buried bedrock and sand-and-gravel aquifers vary from 1300 to 500,000 gallons per day per square mile (gpd/sq mi). The lowest rate is for an area where the Cambrian-Ordovician Aquifer is overlain by the Maquoketa Formation consisting mostly of shale; the highest rate is for an area where a sand-and-gravel aquifer is overlain by permeable coarse-grained deposits. Groundwater recharge generally is at a maximum during wet spring months; in many years there is little recharge during the five-month period July through November. The theoretical aspects of recharge from precipitation are discussed; recharge rates vary with the coefficient of vertical permeability, the vertical head loss associated with recharge, and the saturated thickness of deposits through which vertical leakage of water occurs. Recharge rates are not constant but vary in space and time. A summary of coefficients of vertical permeability and leakage of deposits overlying aquifers within the state is presented. Coefficients of vertical permeability of glacial deposits range from 1.60 to 0.01 gallons per day per square foot (gpd/sq ft). The average coefficient of vertical permeability of the Maquoketa Formation is 0.00005 gpd/sq ft. Coefficients of leakage of glacial deposits and bedrock confining beds range from 2.3 x 10-1 to 2.5 x 10-7. Annual ground-water runoff from 109 drainage basins scattered throughout Illinois is estimated with streamflow hydrograph separation methods and flow-duration curves. The relations between groundwater runoffs during years of near, below, and above normal precipitation and basin characteristics such as geologic environment, topography, and land use were determined by statistical analysis. Groundwater runoff is greatest from glaciated and unglaciated basins having considerable surface sand and gravel and underlain by permeable bedrock. Groundwater runoff is least from glaciated basins with surface lakebed sediments and underlain by impermeable bedrock. Groundwater runoff during a year of near normal precipitation ranges from 0.06 to 0.43 cubic feet per second per square mile (cfs/sq mi). Groundwater runoff is at a maximum during spring and early summer months, and is least in late summer and fall months. Annual groundwater runoff depends upon antecedent moisture conditions as well as the amount and distribution of annual precipitation. Because many aquifers in Illinois are deeply buried, not all groundwater runoff can be diverted into cones of depression because there is some lateral as well as vertical movement of water in surface deposits. Data on groundwater runoff can be useful in estimating recharge to aquifers and in evaluating the potential yield of groundwater reservoirs. However, studies indicate that no simple relation exists between groundwater runoff and the potential or practical sustained yields of aquifers.
  • Exposure to a firefighting overhaul environment without respiratory protection increases immune dysregulation and lung...
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Horn, Gavin P.
    • Gainey, Stephen J.
    • Freund, Gregory G.
    • Kerber, Stephen
    • Fent, Kenneth W.
    • Oelschlager, Maci L.
    • Smith, Denise L.
    • Towers, Albert E.
    • Drnevich, Jenny
    • Tir, Vincent L.
    Description
    Firefighting activities appear to increase the risk of acute and chronic lung disease, including malignancy. While self-contained breathing apparatuses (SCBA) mitigate exposures to inhalable asphyxiates and carcinogens, firefighters frequently remove SCBA during overhaul when the firegrounds appear clear of visible smoke. Using a mouse model of overhaul without airway protection, the impact of fireground environment exposure on lung gene expression was assessed to identify transcripts potentially critical to firefighter-related chronic pulmonary illnesses. Lung tissue was collected 2 hrs post-overhaul and evaluated via whole genome transcriptomics by RNA-seq. Although gas metering showed that the fireground overhaul levels of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen cyanine (HCN), hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and oxygen (O2) were within NIOSH ceiling recommendations, 3852 lung genes were differentially expressed when mice exposed to overhaul were compared to mice on the fireground but outside the overhaul environment. Importantly, overhaul exposure was associated with an up/down-regulation of 86 genes with a fold change of 1.5 or greater (p<0.5) including the immunomodulatory-linked genes S100a8 and Tnfsf9 (downregulation) and the cancer-linked genes, Capn11 and Rorc (upregulation). Taken together these findings indicate that, without respiratory protection, exposure to the fireground overhaul environment is associated with transcriptional changes impacting proteins potentially related to inflammation-associated lung disease and cancer.
  • The silting of Lake Springfield: Springfield, Illinois
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Smith, H.M.
    • Gottschalk, L.C.
    • Stall, John Byron
    Description
    Cover title.
  • Groundwater resources in Winnebago County: With specific reference to conditions at Rockford
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Smith, H.F.
    • Larson, Thurston Eric
    Description
    Enumeration continues through succeeding title.
  • Bubbler system instrumentation for water level measurement
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Nelson, Gerald Hubert
    Description
    Bibliographical footnotes.
  • Selected methods for pumping test analysis
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Hudson, Herbert Edson
    • Bruin, Jack
    Description
    Includes bibliographical references (p. 38).
  • The water level problem at Crystal Lake, McHenry County
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Sasman, Robert Thomas
    Description
    Includes bibliographical references (p. 27).
  • Potential water resources of Southern Illinois
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Hanson, Ross
    • Changnon, Stanley A., Jr.
    • Larson, Thurston E.
    • Huff, Floyd A.
    • Roberts, Wyndham J.
    Description
    Bibliography: p. 96-97.
  • The silting of West Frankfort Reservoir, West Frankfort, Illinois
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Sauer, E.L.
    • Melsted, S.W.
    • Stall, John Byron
    • Klingebiel, Albert A.
    Description
    Bibliographical footnotes.
  • The silting of Lake Calhoun: Galva, Illinois
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Stall, John Byron
    Description
    Enumeration continues through succeeding title.
  • Ground-water levels and pumpage in East St. Louis area, Illinois, 1890-1961
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Schicht, Richard John
    • Jones, E.G.
    Description
    Enumeration continues through succeeding title.
  • Groundwater resources in Lee and Whiteside Counties
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Hanson, Ross Arnold
    Description
    Enumeration continues through succeeding title.
  • Yields of deep sandstone wells in Northern Illinois
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Walton, William Clarence
    • Csallany, Sandor
    Description
    Enumeration continues through succeeding title.
  • A performer's guide to Heitor Villa-Lobos’s violin concerto, "Fantasia de movimentos mixtos"
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Shin, Sung Hee
    Description
    This essay concerns the Brazilian composer Heitor Villa-Lobos’s Fantasia de movimentos mixtos, “Fantasy of Mixed Movements,” for violin and orchestra. Written and revised over a span of almost two decades, 1921–41, this piece is relatively unknown in writings and performance, despite its unique synthesis of Brazilian, indigenous Amerindian, and Western European elements. Chapter One addresses Villa-Lobos’s recognition as a composer, his musical characteristics, and the historical background of the Fantasia. Chapter Two provides an description of the piano reduction of the piece, arranged by Villa-Lobos himself, with attention to the formal structure and its melodic and harmonic materials, including themes, chords, intervals, and scales, which help us to understand the Fantasia better. Finally, Chapter Three examines performance questions, such as tempo, bowings, and difficulties posed by the piece, suggesting possible solutions. Because of some inconsistencies between the solo violin and piano parts, such as dynamics and expression markings, I consulted Villa-Lobos’s manuscript orchestral score as a reference. Especially, I hope my recording of Villa-Lobos’s Fantasia using his piano reduction as well as my videos uploaded on YouTube about sections, tempo, and bowings will inspire other violinists to explore the piece.
  • PWW Digital Scholarly Publishing Incubation Workshop at University of Minnesota
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Swatscheno, Janet
    • Green, Harriett
    • Bonn, Maria
    • thomas-houston, marilyn
    • Senseney, Megan
    Description
    On September 10, 2018, Publishing Without Walls conducted a day-long incubation workshop on digital scholarly publishing at the University of Minnesota with the goal of engaging with scholars the tools and platform hosted by PWW and opportunities to participate in the PWW initiative.
  • COOPERATIVE AGRICULTURAL PEST SURVEY – Annual Report
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Helm, Charles
    Description
    This annual report outlines exotic pest detection activities conducted according to guidelines issued by the Eastern Region Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey from January 1, 2005 through December 31, 2005. The document format will basically follow the outline provided in Appendix H - Annual Report Form. The approved Illinois Calendar Year 2005 CAPS Work Plan consisted of a core program that outlined specific state activities including target pest surveys and maintenance of the CAPS network. Part II of the 2005 program focused on exotic woodborer/bark beetle surveys at high-risk sites in Illinois as part of the National Exotic Woodboring/Bark Beetle Survey. The original workplan was revised on June 29, 2005 to reflect an additional $25,000 award for the Soybean Rust Early Detection Project. Results of these funded surveys and other survey activities not requiring support are included in this report.