University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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Showing 241–280 of 2,281,243 items
  • The Doubling: Those Influential Writers That Shape Our Contemporary Perceptions of Identity and Consciousness in the New...
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Shaughnessy, Michael F.
    • Sheets, Diana E.
    Description
    The Doubling: Those Influential Writers That Shape Our Contemporary Perceptions of Identity and Consciousness in the New Millennium examines pairs of writers, 28 in all, to compare and contrast their books, their personalities, and their responses to the age in which they lived. In the case of the chapter devoted to the black experience, it also includes an overview of some of the greatest African-American writers of the 20th century and their most memorable work. The scope of The Doubling extends from the inception of the modern novel through the present. The book is presented in a Q & A format with Diana Sheets responding to questions posed by Michael F. Shaughnessy. Their conversation offers penetrating insights in light of recent scholarship and established criticism. The Doubling is uniquely suited to serve as a textbook in high school and college classrooms, in libraries, and educational institutions.
  • When scientists meet the public: an investigation into citizen cyberscience
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Peter T. Darch
    Description
    Citizen Cyberscience Projects (CCPs) are projects mediated through the Internet, in which teams of scientists recruit members of the public (volunteers) to assist in scientific research, typically through the processing of large quantities of data. This thesis presents qualitative ethnographic case studies of the communities that have formed around two such projects, climateprediction.net and Galaxy Zoo. By considering these social actors in the broader contexts in which they are situated (historical, institutional, social, scientific), I discuss the co-shaping of the interests of these actors, the nature of the relationships amongst these actors, and the infrastructure of the projects and the purposes and nature of the scientific work performed. The thesis focusses on two relationships in particular. The first is that between scientists and volunteers, finding that, although scientists in both projects are concerned with treating volunteers with respect, there are nevertheless considerable differences between the projects. These are related to a number of interconnecting factors, including the particular contexts in which each project is embedded, the nature of the scientific work that volunteers are asked to undertake, the possibilities and challenges for the future development of the projects as perceived by the scientists, and the tools at the disposal of the respective teams of scientists for mediating relationships with volunteers. The second is amongst the volunteers themselves. This thesis argues that volunteers are heterogeneous, from disparate backgrounds, and that they sustain their involvement in CCPs for very different purposes. In particular, they seek to pursue these through the way they negotiate and construct their relationships with other volunteers, drawing on particular features of the project to do so. This thesis contributes to two fields. The first is to Citizen Cyberscience itself, with a view to improving the running of such projects. Some social studies have already been conducted of CCPs to this end, and this thesis both extends the analysis of some of these pre-existing studies and also problematizes aspects of CCPs that these studies had not considered. I discuss the significance of my findings for those involved in setting up and running a CCP, and present some recommendations for practice. The second field is Science and Technology Studies, in particular studies of public engagement with scientific and technological decision- and knowledge-making processes. The modes of engagement found in CCPs differ in key ways from those that have already been documented in the existing literature (in particular, different power relationships) and thus offer new ways of understanding how the public might be engaged successfully in such processes.
  • MICROWAVE SPECTRA OF THE TWO CONFORMERS OF PROPENE-3-d1 AND A SEMIEXPERIMENTAL EQUILIBRIUM STRUCTURE OF PROPENE
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Craig, Norman C.
    Description
    FT microwave spectra have been observed and analyzed for the S (in-plane) and A (out-of-plane) conformers of propene-3-{em d}$_1$ in the 10-22 GHz region. Both conformers display splittings due to deuterium quadrupole coupling; for the latter one only, a 19 MHz splitting due to internal rotation of the partially deuterated methyl group has been observed. In addition to rotational constants, the analysis yielded quadrupole coupling constants and parameters describing the tunneling splitting and its rotational dependence. Improved rotational constants for parent propene and the three $^{13}$C$_1$ species are recently available.footnote{ N. C. Craig, P. Groner, A. R. Conrad, R. Gurusinghe, M. J. Tubergen J. Mol. Spectrosc. 248, 1-6 (2016).} Use of vibration-rotation interaction constants computed at the MP2(FC)/cc-pVTZ level gave equilibrium rotational constants for these six species and for fourteen more deuterium isotopologues with diminished accuracy from early literature data. A semiexperimental equilibrium structure, $r$$_e$$^{SE}$, has been determined for propene by fitting fourteen structural parameters to the equilibrium rotational constants. The new $r$$_e$$^{SE}$ structure compares well with an ab initio equilibrium structure computed with the all-electron CCSD(T)/cc-pV(Q,T)Z model and with a structure obtained using the mixed regression method with predicates and equilibrium rotational constants.
  • KEY INTERMEDIATES OF CARBON DIOXIDE REDUCTION ON SILVER FROM VIBRATIONAL NANOSPECTROSCOPY
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Jain, Prashant
    Description
    The design of efficacious, selective heterogeneous catalysts relies on the knowledge of the nature of active sites and reactive intermediates involved in the catalytic transformation. This is also true in the case of carbon dioxide reduction, an important scientific and technological problem. With the goal of furthering mechanistic understanding of a complex transformation that yields multiple products, we are employing surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) to image carbon dioxide photoreduction on individual Ag nanoparticles within a heterogeneous dispersion. The lack of ensemble-averaging is allowing us to detect fleeting intermediates in the adsorption and catalytic photoreduction processes. In particular, we have detected on some sites physisorbed CO$_{2}$ and at others chemisorbed CO$_{2}$$^{-}$ anion radical, a critical intermediate in carbon dioxide reduction. The primary product formed also appears to vary from one catalytic nanoparticle to another: CO, formaldehyde, or formic acid. The origin of such heterogeneities in adsorption and photoreduction behavior are being traced to differences in nanoparticle structure or surface composition, from which structure/activity relationships will be established, with aid from electronic structure theory. This single-nanoparticle approach is providing molecular-level insights into a broad range of industrially and environmentally relevant catalytic transformations.
  • CONFORMATIONAL ANALYSIS OF 3,3,3-TRIFLUORO-2-(TRIFLUOROMETHYL)PROPANOIC ACID
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Lin, Wei
    Description
    Partially fluorinated carboxylic acids exhibit rich conformational landscapes. We report the first high-resolution spectroscopic study of 3,3,3-trifluoro-2-(trifluoromethyl)propanoic acid. Its rotational spectrum was measured using both broadband chirped-pulse and narrow-band cavity-based Fourier transform microwave spectrometers. Two dominant conformers were observed, and their structures confirmed with the aid of quantum chemical calculations. Both conformers take on the Z form of the carboxylic acid group. Similarities and differences between this and other fluorinated carboxylic acids are discussed.
  • A COMBINED GIGAHERTZ AND TERAHERTZ SYNCHROTRON-BASED FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC INVESTIGATION OF...
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Chen, Ziqiu
    Description
    Tunneling switching is a fundamental phenomenon of interest in molecular quantum dynamics including also chiral molecules and parity violation.footnote{M. Quack , textit{Fundamental Symmetries and Symmetry Violations from High-resolution Spectroscopy}, textit{Handbook of High Resolution Spectroscopy, M. Quack and F. Merkt eds.},John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester, New York, 2001, vol. 1, ch. 18, pp. 659-722.}$^{,}$footnote{R. Prentner, M. Quack, J. Stohner and M. Willeke, textit{J. Phys. Chem. A} textbf{119}, 12805-12822 (2015).}$^{,}$footnote {S. Albert, Z. Chen, C. F'{a}bri, R. Prentner M. Quack and D. Zindel, paper at this meeting.} Deuterated phenols have been identified as prototypical achrial candidates.footnote{S. Albert, Ph. Lerch, R. Prentner and M. Quack, textit{Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.} textbf{52}, 346-349 (2013).} We report the high resolution spectroscopic investigation of the ortho-D-phenol in the GHz and THz ranges following our recent discovery of tunneling switching in its isotopomer meta-D-phenol.footnote{label{myfootnote}S. Albert, Z. Chen, C. F'{a}bri,P. Lerch, R. Prentner and M. Quack, emph{Mol.Phys.} textbf{114}, 2751-2768 (2016) and emph{71st International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy}, Urbana-Champaign, USA, June 20-24, Talk FE04 (2016).} Here we report new results on ortho-D-phenol.The pure rotational spectra were recorded in the range of 72-117 GHz and assigned to the syn- and anti- structures in the ground and the first excited torsional states. Specific torsional states were assigned based on a comparison of experimental rotational constants with the quasiadiabatic channel reaction path Hamiltonian (RPH) calculations. The torsional fundamental at ~308 cm$^{-1}$ and the first hot band at 275 cm$^{-1}$ were subsequently assigned. The analyses of pure rotational and rovibrational spectra shall be discussed in detail in relation to possible tunneling switching.
  • Educational Programming Application for Preschool Students Using Virtual Tangible Interface Implemented by Microsoft...
    Scholarship
    Creator
    He, Ziyun
    Description
    In the 1960s, pioneer of constructionist learning, Professor Emeritus Seymour Papert envisioned that future education with computers would promote a more dynamic environment where children could take charge of the machines and build their own creations, as opposed to simply following prepackaged instructions. Thus, a tangible interface was first introduced by his team, aiming to take away the abstraction of computer screens and replace controls with direct and intuitive manipulation of physical toys. While tangible interfaces have created an enormous field of research, the evolution of pure on-line programming education has also begun. With the emerging technology of augmented reality such as Microsoft HoloLens, the dilemma might find its final resolution. With its transparent vision, a pair of HoloLens glasses, along with its clicker for intuitive manipulation, allows the rework and combination of concepts in both tangible user interface and on-line programming tools. The first part of this research is to study relevant work, analyze interfaces and systems built by other groups, and identify the key factors that have made their work successful. Then, a HoloLens application was carefully designed and crafted on top of the key concepts, aiming to combine the advantages of both areas. During testing, we found that part of the experience was limited by the physical hardware as the technology was still at its initial stage. However, the application itself was able to inherit the successes and make the user experience immediate, accessible and intuitive.
  • When Scientists Become Social Scientists: How Citizen Science Projects Learn About Volunteers
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Darch, Peter T.
    Description
    Online citizen science projects involve recruitment of volunteers to assist researchers with the creation, curation, and analysis of large datasets. Enhancing the quality of these data products is a fundamental concern for teams running citizen science projects. Decisions about a project’s design and operations have a critical effect both on whether the project recruits and retains enough volunteers, and on the quality of volunteers’ work. The processes by which the team running a project learn about their volunteers play a critical role in these decisions. Improving these processes will enhance decision-making, resulting in better quality datasets, and more successful outcomes for citizen science projects. This paper presents a qualitative case study, involving interviews and long-term observation, of how the team running Galaxy Zoo, a major citizen science project in astronomy, came to know their volunteers and how this knowledge shaped their decision-making processes. This paper presents three instances that played significant roles in shaping Galaxy Zoo team members’ understandings of volunteers. Team members integrated heterogeneous sources of information to derive new insights into the volunteers. Project metrics and formal studies of volunteers combined with tacit understandings gained through on- and offline interactions with volunteers. This paper presents a number of recommendations for practice. These recommendations include strategies for improving how citizen science project team members learn about volunteers, and how teams can more effectively circulate among themselves what they learn.
  • PRECISION SPECTROSCOPY OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN AND THE SEARCH FOR NEW PHYSICS
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Ubachs, Wim
    Description
    The hydrogen molecule is the smallest neutral chemical entity and a benchmark system of molecular spectroscopy. The comparison between highly accurate measurements of transition frequencies and level energies with quantum calculations including all known phenomena (relativistic, vacuum polarization and self energy) provides a tool to search for physical phenomena in the realm of the unknown: are there forces beyond the three included in the Standard Model of physics plus gravity [1], are there extra dimensions beyond the 3+1 describing space time [2] ? Comparison of laboratory wavelengths of transitions in hydrogen may be compared with the lines observed during the epoch of the early Universe to verify whether fundamental constants of Nature have varied over cosmological time [3]. These concepts, as well as the precision laboratory experiments and the astronomical observations used for such searches of new physics [4] will be discussed._x000d_ _x000d_ [1] E.J. Salumbides, J.C.J. Koelemeij, J. Komasa, K. Pachucki, K.S.E. Eikema, W. Ubachs, emph{Bounds on fifth forces from precision measurements on molecules}, Phys. Rev. D87, 112008 (2013)._x000d_ _x000d_ [2] E.J. Salumbides, A.N. Schellekens, B. Gato-Rivera, W. Ubachs_x000d_ emph{Constraints on extra dimensions from molecular spectroscopy},_x000d_ New. J. Phys. 17, 033015 (2015)._x000d_ _x000d_ [3] W. Ubachs, J. Bagdonaite, E.J. Salumbides, M.T. Murphy, L. Kaper,_x000d_ emph{Search for a drifting proton-electron mass ratio from H$_2$},_x000d_ Rev. Mod. Phys. 88, 021003 (2016)._x000d_ _x000d_ [4] W. Ubachs, J.C.J. Koelemeij, K.S.E. Eikema, E.J. Salumbides,_x000d_ emph{Physics beyond the Standard Model from hydrogen spectroscopy},_x000d_ J. Mol. Spectr. 320, 1 (2016).
  • INFRARED SPECTRUM OF N-OXIDOHYDROXYLAMINE [•ONH(OH)] PRODUCED IN REACTION H + HONO IN SOLID PARA-HYDROGEN
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Lee, Yuan-Pern
    Description
    Hydrogenation reactions in the N/O chemical network are important for an understanding of the mechanism of formation of organic molecules in dark interstellar clouds, but many reactions remain unknown. We present the results of the reaction H + HONO in solid ${para}$-hydrogen (${p}$-H$_{2}$) at 3.3 K investigated with infrared spectra. Two methods that produced hydrogen atoms were the irradiation of HONO molecules in ${p}$-H$_{2}$ at 365 nm to produce OH radicals that reacted readily with nearby H$_{2}$ to produce mobile H atoms, and irradiation of Cl$_{2}$ molecules (co-deposited with HONO) in ${p}$-H$_{2}$ at 405 nm to produce Cl atoms that reacted readily with nearby H$_{2}$ to produce mobile H atoms. In both experiments, we assigned IR lines at 3549.6 (nub{1}), 1465.0 (nub{3}), 1372.2 (nub{4}), 895.6/898.5 (nub{6}), and 630.9 (nub{7}) wn to N-oxidohydroxylamine [•ONH(OH)], the primary product of HONO hydrogenation. The assignments were derived according to the consideration of possible reactions and comparison of observed vibrational wavenumbers and their IR intensities with values predicted with the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ method of quantum-chemical calculations. The agreement between observed and calculated D/H- and $^{15}$N/$^{14}$N-isotopic ratios further supports these assignments. The role of this reaction in the N/O chemical network in dark interstellar clouds is discussed.
  • Workset Creation for Scholarly Analysis and Data Capsules (WCSA+DC): Laying the foundations for secure computation with...
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Downie, J. Stephen
    • Cole, Timothy W.
    • Unsworth John
    • Plale, Beth
    • Namachchivaya, Beth Sandore
    • McDonald, Robert
    Description
    The primary objective of the WCSA+DC project is the seamless integration of the workset model and tools with the Data Capsule framework to provide non-consumptive research access HathiTrust’s massive corpus of data objects, securely and at scale, regardless of copyright status. That is, we plan to surmount the copyright wall on behalf of scholars and their students. Notwithstanding the substantial preliminary work that has been done on both the WCSA and DC fronts, they are both still best characterized as being in the prototyping stages. It is our intention to that this proposed Phase I of the project devote an intense two-year burst of effort to move the suite of WCSA and DC prototypes from the realm of proof-of-concept to that of a firmly integrated at-scale deployment. We plan to concentrate our requested resources on making sure our systems are as secure and robust at scale as possible. Phase I will engage four external research partners. Two of the external partners, Kevin Page (Oxford) and Annika Hinze (Waikato) were recipients of WCSA prototyping sub-awards. We are very glad to propose extending and refining aspects of their prototyping work in the context of WCSA+DC. Two other scholars, Ted Underwood (Illinois) and James Pustejovsky (Brandeis) will play critical roles in Phase I as active participants in the development and refinement of the tools and systems from their particular user-scholar perspectives: Underwood, Digital Humanities (DH); Pustejovsky, Computational Linguistics (CL). The four key outcomes and benefits of the WCSA+DC, Phase I project are: 1. The deployment of a new Workset Builder tool that enhances search and discovery across the entire HTDL by complementing traditional volume-level bibliographic metadata with new metadata derived from a variety of sources at various levels granularity. 2. The creation of Linked Open Data resources to help scholars find, select, integrate and disseminate a wider range of data as part of their scholarly analysis life-cycle. 3. A new Data Capsule framework that integrates worksets, runs at scale, and does both in a secure, non-consumptive, manner. 4. A set of exemplar pre-built Data Capsules that incorporate tools commonly used by both the DH and CL communities that scholars can then customize to their specific needs.
  • COMPLEX MOLECULES IN THE LABORATORY - A COMPARISON OF CHRIPED PULSE AND EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Hermanns, Marius
    Description
    Detecting molecules of astrophysical interest in the interstellar medium strongly relies on precise spectroscopic data from the laboratory. In recent years, the advancement of the chirped-pulse technique has added many more options available to choose from. The Cologne emission spectrometer is an additional path to molecular spectroscopy. It allows to record instantaneously broad band spectra _x000d_ with calibrated intensities._x000d_ Here we present a comparison of both methods: The Cologne chirped-pulse spectrometer as well as the Cologne emission spectrometer both cover the frequency range of 75-110 GHz, consistent with the ALMA Band 3 receivers. High sensitive heterodyne receivers with very low noise temperature amplifiers are used with a typical bandwidth of 2.5 GHz in a single sideband. Additionally the chirped-pulse spectrometer contains a high power amplifier of 200 mW for the excitation of molecules._x000d_ Room temperature spectra of methyl cyanide and comparison of key features, such as measurement time, sensitivity, limitations and commonalities are shown in respect to identification of complex molecules of astrophysical importance. In addition, future developments for both setups will be discussed.
  • FOUR STRUCTURES OF TARTARIC ACID REVEALED IN THE GAS PHASE
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Alonso, José L.
    Description
    The tartaric acid, one of the most important organic compounds, has been transferred into the gas phase by laser ablation of its natural crystalline form (m.p.174ºC) and probed in a supersonic expansion by chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (CP-FTMW). Four stable structures, two with an extended (trans) disposition of the carbon chain and two with a bent (gauche) disposition, have been unequivocally identified on the basis of the experimental rotational constants in conjunction with ab initio predictions. The intramolecular interactions that govern the conformational preferences are dominated by cooperative O-H···O=C type and O-H…O hydrogen bonds extended along the entire molecule. The observation of only $mu$c- type spectra for one “trans” and one “gauche” conformers, support the existence of a C2 symmetry for each structure.
  • Energy and Carbon Capture Technology Research -- Lab-Scale Studies
    Scholarship
    Description
    Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from coal-fired power plants and other industrial facilities need to be reduced as part of U.S. EPA's Clean Power Plan. Current carbon capture technologies are very energy intensive and nearly double the cost of generating electricity. Therefore, the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) has set a goal of developing a technology that can remove 90% of the CO2 released from coal combustion with a 30% lower cost of electricity than the current benchmark approaches. ISTC is collaborating with the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) and the Applied Research Institute on campus and external partner Trimeric Corporation of Buda, Texas to demonstrate a novel biphasic CO2 absorption process (BICAP) and generate engineering and scale-up data for next-stage scale up.
  • MICROWAVE SPECTROSCOPY OF 2-PENTANONE
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Kleiner, Isabelle
    Description
    Methyl propyl ketone (MPK) or 2-Pentanone is known to be an alarm pheroromone released by the mandibular glands of the bees._x000d_ It is a highly volatile compound. This molecule was studied by a combination of quantum chemical calculations and microwave _x000d_ spectroscopy in order to get informations about the lowest energy conformers and their structures.The rotational spectrum of 2-pentanone was measured using the molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer in Aachen operating between 2 and 26.5 GHz. Ab initio calculations determine 4 conformers but only two of them are observed in our jet-beam conditions.The lowest conformer has a $C_{1}$ structure and its spectrum shows internal rotation splittings arising from two methyl groups. The internal splittings of 305 transitions for this conformer were analyzed using the XIAM code footnote{ H. Hartwig, H. Dreizler, Z. Naturforsch. 51a, 923 _x000d_ (1996).}. It led to the determination of the values for the barrier heights hindering the internal rotation of two methyl groups_x000d_ of 239 cm$^{-1}$ and 980 cm$^{-1}$ respectively. The next energy conformer has a $C_{s}$ structure and the analysis of the internal splittings of 134 transitions using the XIAM code and the BELGI code footnote{J. T. Hougen, I. Kleiner and M. Godefroid, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 163, 559-586 (1994).} led to the determination of internal rotation barrier height of 186 cm$^{-1}$. Comparisons of quantum chemistry and experimental results will be discussed.
  • An Operating-System-Level Framework for Providing Application-Aware Reliability
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Gu, Weining
    • Iyer, Ravi
    • Kalbarczyk, Zbigniew
    • Wang, Long
    Description
    Operating systems enable collecting and extracting rich information on application execution characteristics, including program counter traces, memory access patterns, and operating-system-generated signals. This information can be exploited to design highly efficient, application-aware reliability mechanisms that are transparent to applications. This paper describes the Reliability MicroKernel framework (RMK), a loadable kernel module for providing application-aware reliability and dynamically configuring reliability mechanisms installed in RMK. The RMK prototype is implemented in Linux and supports detection of application/OS failures and transparent application checkpointing. Experiment results show that the OS hang detection and application hang detection, which exploit characteristics of application and system behavior, can achieve 100% coverage and low false positive rates. Moreover, the performance overhead of RMK and the detection/checkpointing mechanisms is small (0.6% for application hang detection and 0.1% for transparent application checkpointing in the experiments).
  • Replication Data for "A Measured Perspective"
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Underwood, Ted
    Description
    Tab-separated files containing wordcounts from volumes of fiction. The names of the files are keyed to volume IDs in HathiTrust Digital Library. Data was prepared using code in the repository supporting "A Measured Perspective." (https://github.com/tedunderwood/measureperspective) Code analyzing the data is contained in the same repository.
  • What STEM and International Graduate Students Value in Higher Education and Library Services
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Yu, Jen-chien
    • Carlstone, Jamie
    • Trei, Kelli
    Description
    Background: In 2016, the Ithaka S+R Graduate Student Survey was administered at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. According to the Institute of International Education, in 2016 international graduate students made up 49% of total on-campus enrollment. The majority of these students were enrolled in Liberal Arts & Science and the College of Engineering. While there is research into graduate students’ perception of institutions and their libraries, less has been published about STEM and international student perspectives. In this study we examine those perspectives and where they intersect. Methods: We filtered survey respondents to four groups: international STEM graduate students (ISG), STEM students, international students, and none of the above. We applied the answers of these populations to modules in the Ithaka study related to higher education and the role of the library. We conducted the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test (MWW) using RStudio to compare the means of the ISG group and the Non-ISG group. The MWW test was used to detect overlap between the two groups. Then we compared the means of the variables identified to determine whether the STEM or international populations could explain the variance we observed. Results: All graduate student populations examined valued their college experience thus far. In other areas the MWW test showed statistically significant differences between the groups. ISG students valued collaboration with faculty and other students and involvement in extra-curricular activities such as clubs higher than other groups. They also placed less significance on the library as a physical or virtual space for accessing information. International students valued having a high GPA and put more value in the library’s role in supporting research and assisting with ethical issues like plagiarism. They also frequented physical libraries the most. Interestingly, only non-international, non-STEM students highly valued getting a job after graduating. Conclusions: International, STEM, and international-STEM graduate students seem to have perceptions of library service that are distinct from other graduate populations. Librarians and academic institutions should continue to assess the perceptions and experiences of graduate level international STEM students in order to ascertain how we can change or adjust services to meet needs and contribute to student success.
  • Proving Ground Confluence of Equational Specifications Modulo Axioms
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Duran, Francisco
    • Meseguer, Jose
    • Rocha, Camilo
    Description
    Terminating functional programs should be deterministic, i.e., should evaluate to a unique result, regardless of the evaluation order. For equational functional programs such determinism is exactly captured by the ground confluence property. For terminating equations this is equivalent to ground local confluence, which follows from local confluence. Checking local confluence by computing critical pairs is the standard way to check ground confluence. The problem is that some perfectly reasonable equational programs are not locally confluent and it can be very hard or even impossible to make them so by adding more equations. We propose a three-step strategy to prove that an equational program as is is ground confluent: First: apply the strategy proposed in [8] to use non-joinable critical pairs as completion hints to either achieve local confluence or reduce the number of critical pairs. Second: use the inductive inference system proposed in this paper to prove the remaining critical pairs ground joinable. Third: to show ground confluence of the original specification, prove also ground joinable the equations added. These methods apply to order-sorted and possibly conditional equational programs modulo axioms such as, e.g., Maude functional modules.
  • A performance guide to four pieces with Jewish and Gypsy themes by Sylvie Bodorová
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Renner, Timothy Michael Jr.
    Description
    About thirty years into her professional career, Czech composer Sylvie Bodorová (b. 1954) turned her focus specifically toward Jewish themes for compositional inspiration. Beginning with the Terezín Ghetto Requiem, which is now perhaps her best known work, she went on to write four pieces over the next five years centered around some aspect of Jewish culture, history, liturgy, or tradition. The present essay discusses this group of compositions, with particular attention to compositional aspects and performance issues in the individual works. Chapter 1 begins with a brief biography of Sylvie Bodorová and an introduction to her compositional interests in the period 1997-2002. Chapter 2 examines the Terezín Ghetto Requiem (1997), scored for string quartet and baritone soloist, which was inspired specifically by the courage of Jews and other persecuted people who suffered in the Holocaust. At the concentration camp at Terezín (Theresienstadt), many prisoners had continued artistic pursuits while interned, some involving themselves in musical composition and staging theatrical works and concerts. One of their culminating achievements was the mounting of some twenty complete performances of Verdi’s Messa da Requiem, a masterwork the Bodorová Requiem references. Chapter 3 focuses on the Bodorová song cycle for baritone entitled Ama me (1999), which celebrates maternal love. While no Jewish themes are present in its three songs, the influence of Gypsy music, which bears much in common with Jewish music, affects Bodorová’s style in this work. Chapter 4 discusses another string quartet, Shofarot (2000), in which Bodorová revisited elements of Jewish liturgy. In its three movements, the composer reimagines the various calls of the shofar through the medium of stringed instruments. Chapter 5 considers the piano trio Megiddo (2001), a composition of a very programmatic nature, with each movement evoking images of Israeli geography or Jewish tradition relating to the Jezreel Valley. Finally, the Conclusion places these compositions in a larger perspective, drawing in part on Bodorová’s own statements about the influence of Jewish and Gypsy themes in her music.
  • Exploring the Benefits for Users of Linked Open Data for Digitized Special Collections: Google Analytics data summary
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Jett, Jacob
    Description
    In addition to one-on-one user interactions and a planned focus group, additional assessment methods, i.e., site traffic data gathered from Google Analytics and test queries using Google’s search engine, were used to produce supplementary benchmark data. The sections below summarize the facts observed from these two data collections.
  • Exploring the Benefits for Users of Linked Open Data for Digitized Special Collections: Benchmark case studies of two...
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Zavala, Melina
    • Kinnaman, Alex
    • Jett, Jacob
    • Cole, Timothy W.
    Description
    This report presents the results from a pair of case studies conducted as part of the Exploring the benefits for users of Linked Open Data for digitized special collections project. Each case study was produced from a series of interviews with users of digital special collections. The case studies compare the Motley Collection of Theatre & Costume Design1 (Motley) to the Harvard Theatre Collection2 and the Kolb-Proust Archive for Research3 (KPA) to the Bovary Manuscript Archive4 respectively. Each of the users was a volunteer and was asked to compare to digital collection websites to one another during the course of completing a series of user tasks which included assessing the overall layout and utility of each digital collection’s interface, searching for a specific resource, and characterizing how they might employ the collections in their research.
  • Verification of Illinois grouping code scheme for the Illinois portion of the USF&WS National Wetlands Inventory:...
    Scholarship
    Description
    First quarterly report to document classification of Illinois wetlands. A subsequent quarterly report was published (see http://hdl.handle.net/2142/96071). Additional reference documents include: Suloway, Liane and Marvin Hubbell (1994). Wetland Resources of Illinois, An Analysis and Atlas, Illinois Natural History Survey Special Publication 15.; and Cowardin, Lewis M., Virginia Carter, Francis C. Golet, and Edward T. LaRoe (1979). Classification of Wetlands and Deepwater Habitats of the United States, Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of the Interior, RWS.OBS-79/31.
  • Improvisational and creative techniques employed by baritone saxophonist Ronnie Cuber on the blues and its variants
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Barnett, Adrian Arthur
    Description
    Ronnie Cuber stands out as one of the most notable baritone saxophonists in recent history. Throughout his career he has worked alongside a variety of notable musicians such as Slide Hampton, Maynard Ferguson, Eddie Palmieri, George Benson, Paul Simon, Eric Clapton, and Frank Zappa among many others. His approach to playing the baritone saxophone showcases his ability to incorporate his experience playing an assortment of musical styles from bebop and Latin music to funk, pop, and R&B. The focus of this project is to investigate the creative techniques employed by Ronnie Cuber in regards to his improvisations and compositions based on the 12-bar blues form. This includes transcriptions of eight of Cuber’s solos on five of his compositions. The transcriptions are accompanied by in-depth analysis and discussion on each of the selected works. The analyses will encompass harmonic and melodic creative techniques and material, idiomatic techniques of playing the baritone saxophone, quotes, etc., as well as discussing signature traits of Ronnie Cuber’s playing style such as reoccurring melodic ideas, consistent harmonic navigation over a specific chord type or set of chord changes, and structure of solos over the blues form. Following the solo analysis is a discussion of Ronnie Cuber’s original compositions based on the 12-bar blues form which addresses variations on both the form and harmonic structure.
  • Classification via Minimum Incremental Coding Length (MICL)
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Shum, Heung-Yeung
    • Ma, Yi
    • Tao, Yangyu
    • Lin, Zhuochen
    • Wright, John
    Description
    We present a simple new criterion for classification, based on principles from lossy data compression. The criterion assigns a test sample to the class that uses the minimum number of additional bits to code the test sample, subject to an allowable distortion. We rigorously prove asymptotic optimality of this criterion for Gaussian data and analyze its relationships to classical classifiers. The theoretical results provide new insights into the relationships among a variety of popular classifiers such as MAP, RDA, k-NN, and SVM. Our formulation induces several good effects on the resulting classifier. First, minimizing the lossy coding length induces a regularization effect which stabilizes the (implicit) density estimate in a small sample setting. Second, compression provides a uniform means of handling classes of varying dimension. The new criterion and its kernel and local versions perform competitively on synthetic examples, as well as on real imagery data such as handwritten digits and face images. On these problems, the performance of our simple classifier approaches the best reported results, without using domain-specific information. All MATLAB code and classification results will be made publicly available for peer evaluation.
  • Hilbert Functions and Applications to the Estimation of Subspace Arrangements
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Ma, Yi
    • Fossum, Robert M.
    • Rao, Shankar
    • Wagner, Andrew
    • Yang, Allen Y.
    Description
    This paper develops a new mathematical framework for studying the subspace-segmentation problem. We examine some important algebraic properties of subspace arrangements that are closely related to the subspace-segmentation problem. More specifically, we introduce an important class of invariants given by the Hilbert functions. We show that there exist rich relations between subspace arrangements and their corresponding Hilbert functions. We propose a new subspace- segmentation algorithm, and showcase two applications to demonstrate how the new theoretical revelation may solve subspace segmentation and model selection problems under less restrictive conditions with improved results.
  • Data for Chapter 4 of Distant Horizons
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Underwood, Ted
    Description
    Data to support chapter 4 of the book _Distant Horizons._ This includes mostly lists of words associated with specific literary characters. The file 4a will unpack into a folder of ~80,000 separate .tsv files, one for each character; the files 4b, 4c, and 4d unpack into a smaller number of larger files that aggregate characters. 4a is in effect a subset of 4b, c, and d, though it is formatted differently. For the argument based on this data, consult the book Distant Horizons, and the supporting code repository: https://github.com/tedunderwood/horizon/tree/master/chapter4.
  • Illinois State Water Survey 2009 Summary Report
    Scholarship
    Description
    Every day, ISWS scientists make significant strides in their efforts to solve society’s challenges and understand how best to use water resources. Survey research endeavors and services in 2009 reflect a continuing commitment to evaluate the quality, quantity, and use of water supplies in Illinois, the Midwest, and the nation.
  • Exploring the Benefits for Users of Linked Open Data for Digitized Special Collections, White paper #2: Analysis of...
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Zavala, Melina
    • Dubnicek, Ryan
    • Kinnaman, Alex
    • Jett, Jacob
    • Szylowicz, Caroline
    • Fenlon, Katrina
    • Cole, Timothy
    • Kudeki, Deren
    Description
    This paper reports on a research study conducted to evaluate experimental, LOD-based features of digital special collections, which investigated the question: how do these features affect the use of digital collections for research? Because humanities researchers are the primary user group for cultural collections, this study focused on what humanities researchers might gain from LOD-based enhancements to digital collections.
  • Food Donation for Schools
    Scholarship
    Creator
    • Dietrich, Kathleen
    • Scrogum, Joy
    Description
    Dr. Kathleen Dietrich of Food Bus discusses how the program works with elementary schools to recover wasted food and donate it to those in need.
  • Provide fewer menu options to avoid over-preparation and/or high volumes of leftovers
    Scholarship
    Description
    Some items available in school lunchrooms which are considered “extra foods” of “minimal nutritional value” are not creditable in offer versus serve (OVS) programs. Eliminating such offerings can reduce confusion in pricing and record keeping. Providing fewer menu items creates less waste, can help prevent over-preparation of food or high volumes of leftovers, and helps to focus efforts on the improvement of food items being served.
  • Submit an original lesson plan on diverting food for animal consumption
    Scholarship
    Description
    Raising awareness of the magnitude of the food waste problem and the issues involved among the next generation, and also examining potential solutions with them, helps to ensure that students will integrate desired behaviors and carry them into their decision-making roles in the future. Changing procedures is important for your school today, but changing the mindsets of students is important for our society tomorrow.
  • Do a baseline lunchroom waste characterization (pre waste-free lunch day or policy implementation)
    Scholarship
    Description
    Before making any changes to your lunchroom procedures that result in the reduction food waste, it’s important to get a feel for the types and quantities of waste being generated on a typical day. A baseline waste characterization helps to identify the major categories of waste that need to be addressed. It can also highlight simple changes that you can make to achieve immediate results.
  • Use creative names to encourage interest in trying new foods, choosing vegetables, etc.
    Scholarship
    Description
    Research has shown that the simple act of giving a food selection an interesting, appealing name can increase the amount of that item actually eaten by students. This marketing technique is simple and costs nothing but the time to be creative. If even slightly more of an item is consumed rather than thrown out because of an appealing name, that's a worthwhile return on investment.
  • INHS Reports, Spring 2003
    Scholarship
    Creator
    Illinois Natural History Survey
    Description
    INHS establishes site for organic research | Cave amphipod respiration in southwestern Illinois; Weather radars reveal bird migration patterns | Largemouth bass virus: an emerging fish pathogen | Important note to subscribers | Species spotlight: striped skunk | Naturalist's apprentice: animals make scents--the pheremone game
  • Establish an on-site compost pile
    Scholarship
    Description
    Onsite composting of food waste has multiple benefits. On site composting reduces the amount of waste your institution is required to send to a landfill. Using the compost on the premises returns essential nutrients required for plant growth back to the soil. Additionally, well made compost prevents soil erosion and overall quality of local soil.